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My program gets stuck in the simple call usleep(1.);. How can that be? What should I look out for?

Edit:

To make things even more confusing, it only gets stuck if I call rand() before:

rand();
usleep(1.);

Both calls individually are just fine.

Edit 2:

Here is a minimal example that works:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
        printf("Calling rand() and then usleep(1) on pid %d \n",getpid());
        rand();
        usleep(1);
        printf("Finished.\n");
        return 0;
}

This one also works:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
        printf("Calling usleep(1.) on pid %d \n",getpid());
        usleep(1.);
        printf("Finished.\n");
        return 0;
}

However, this one does not:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
        printf("Calling rand() and then usleep(1.) on pid %d \n",getpid());
        rand();
        usleep(1.);
        printf("Finished.\n");
        return 0;
}

I compile these with gcc version 4.4.6 using the command gcc -std=c99 main.c. Is the option -std=c99 the problem? But I still don't understand what's going on here.

share|improve this question
    
Are you sure it's stuck inside usleep? Could you please edit your question to include some more context and code, like if the usleep is inside a loop. –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 15 '13 at 15:04
    
I run a debugger and yes, it's stuck in usleep(), or, to be precise, in the internal function __nanosleep_nocancel(). It's not inside a loop. –  hanno Jan 15 '13 at 15:05
1  
I think you have found a bug. Those interesting in such things would like to see the assembly code for that, I am sure. –  Prof. Falken Jan 15 '13 at 15:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're calling usleep() with a double value, while it's specified to take an unsigned integer of type useconds_t with limited range. See the manual page.

Perhaps the conversion fails, on your platform. Try removing the period, and just call it with 1.

Don't introduce casts, it's best to not mention the useconds_t type.

Also, note that this function is obsolete, new POSIX code should use nanosleep() instead.

UPDATE By the way, the manual page linked above also seems to imply that you should #define the proper symbols as listed before #include <unistd.h>, to get this function. You should try that, if you're not getting the prototype the argument will not be automatically converted from double. The (ignored) return value from rand() might also be in some register or on the stack, causing things to further change in that case.

share|improve this answer
    
For some reason this is important, but I'm still confused why it sometimes works and sometimes not. I edited the answer to clarify that. –  hanno Jan 15 '13 at 15:36
    
That's the right answer! Adding, for example, #define __USE_BSD before the include statement does the trick. Thanks! –  hanno Jan 15 '13 at 15:58

from the man page of usleep http://www.manpagez.com/man/3/usleep/, the input parameter of usleep is useconds_t and not float as indicated in your code

share|improve this answer
4  
The compiler should be able to do an implicit type cast without a problem. –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 15 '13 at 15:09
    
For some reason this does the trick! However, I agree with @JoachimPileborg that this should not make a difference. It also doesn't explain the erratic dependance on the rand() call. –  hanno Jan 15 '13 at 15:14

I tried a few things.

  1. There's nothing special about rand(); printf will do it too. The following also shows this behavior (it hangs after saying "Starting"), but if the first printf() is commented out, the program completes.

    include <stdio.h>
    include <unistd.h>
    
    void main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
        printf ("Starting\n"); 
        usleep(10.1);
        printf("Finished.\n");
    }
    
  2. If you compile with -std=gnu89 (or gnu99) rather than -std=c89 (or c99), your program always works.

  3. Various permutations of -o0 to -o3 make no difference.

  4. usleep needs an int, not a float. If you explicitly cast it, i.e. usleep((int)10.1), the program doesn't hang.

  5. Turning on the warnings (-Wall -Wextra -Wconversion) complains about an implicit declaration of usleep.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, stupid editor ate my code formatting. –  Richard Jan 15 '13 at 16:18

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