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Im wondering why the following query doesn't use an index when I EXPLAIN it.

EXPLAIN SELECT 
  `t`.`id`, `t`.`omschrijving_kort`, `t`.`oplos_tijd_issue` 
FROM `incident` `t` 
LEFT OUTER JOIN `plaats` `plaatsen` ON (`plaatsen`.`incident_id`=`t`.`id`)  
WHERE 
  t.type='2' AND t.status='1'
GROUP BY t.id 
ORDER BY `t`.`oplos_tijd_issue` 

My table:

CREATE TABLE `incident` (
  `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL auto_increment,
  `omschrijving_kort` varchar(40) NOT NULL,
  `sla_type` tinyint(1) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `prioriteit` tinyint(1) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `laatste_wijziging` timestamp NULL default NULL,
  `aanmaak_tijd` timestamp NULL default NULL,
  `start_tijd_issue` timestamp NULL default NULL,
  `oplos_tijd_issue` timestamp NULL default NULL,
  `impact` int(11) unsigned default NULL,
  `template_id` int(10) unsigned default NULL,
  `type` tinyint(1) unsigned NOT NULL default '1',
  `subtype` tinyint(1) NOT NULL default '1',
  `status` tinyint(1) unsigned NOT NULL default '1',
  `regio_id` smallint(5) unsigned default NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY  (`id`),
  KEY `FK_template` (`template_id`),
  KEY `start_tijd_issue` (`start_tijd_issue`),
  KEY `id_startTijdIssue` (`id`,`start_tijd_issue`),
  KEY `id_oplosTijdIssue` (`id`,`oplos_tijd_issue`),
  KEY `id_subtype_status` (`id`,`subtype`,`status`),
  KEY `id` (`id`,`afsluiting_tijd`),
  KEY `id_2` (`id`,`oplos_tijd_issue`,`status`),
  KEY `FK_regios` (`regio_id`),
  KEY `id_3` (`id`,`status`),
  KEY `id_4` (`id`,`start_tijd_issue`,`oplos_tijd_issue`,`type`,`status`),
  KEY `id_5` (`id`,`prioriteit`),
  KEY `id_6` (`id`,`type`,`status`,`regio_id`),
  KEY `id_7` (`id`,`oplos_tijd_issue`,`type`,`status`,`regio_id`),
  KEY `id_8` (`id`,`regio_id`),
  KEY `oplos_tijd_issue_2` (`oplos_tijd_issue`,`type`,`status`),
  KEY `id_9` (`oplos_tijd_issue`,`type`,`status`,`id`),
  KEY `id_10` (`id`,`type`,`status`),
  KEY `type` (`type`,`status`,`id`,`oplos_tijd_issue`),
  KEY `oplos_tijd_issue` (`type`,`status`,`oplos_tijd_issue`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

I have tried adding indexes to my table.. Probably too many!

From what I've looked up, an index with (type, status, oplos_tijd_issue) should suffice?

EXPLAIN tells me:

possible keys: type, oplos_tijd_issue  
key: type  
ref: const, const  
Extra: Using where; Using temporary; Using filesort  
share|improve this question
    
Apart from overindexing, your index cardinality is probably too low for MySQL to use the index so it chooses to go trough entire data-set. Even if you set an index, it doesn't mean it'll be used or that it's an optimal index. Indexes aren't "magic", you can't just throw tons of indexes and hope everything works fast. –  N.B. Jan 15 '13 at 15:16
1  
Agree with @N.B.; too many indexes. –  Kermit Jan 15 '13 at 15:32

1 Answer 1

I suspect the problem is a type conversion problem. This can confuse MySQL and indexes. Try this:

EXPLAIN SELECT 
  `t`.`id`, `t`.`omschrijving_kort`, `t`.`oplos_tijd_issue` 
FROM `incident` `t` 
LEFT OUTER JOIN `plaats` `plaatsen` ON (`plaatsen`.`incident_id`=`t`.`id`)  
WHERE 
  t.type=2 AND t.status=1
GROUP BY t.id 
ORDER BY `t`.`oplos_tijd_issue`

Be careful keeping numeric types separate from character types, when you can.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for responding Gordon. Regretfully that's not the cause. There is no change in the EXPLAIN output. –  Jeroen den Haan Jan 21 '13 at 12:14

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