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double *f(int n, double v)
{
  double *a, *p;
  a = malloc(n * sizeof(double));
  if (a != NULL)
    for (p = a; p < a + n; p++)
      *p = v;
  return a;
}

Can you explain me what this function is needed for? Does it copy the content of v in n? If yes, why does it return a? I really don't get it... Thanks in advance.

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2  
In my opinion I suggest to study little bit more C before ask these kind of questions. best wishes! –  Kyrol Jan 15 '13 at 15:49
    
There are an infinite number of C functions that one (who obviously knows NOTHING about C) might not understand ... why not just post all of them to SO? –  Jim Balter Jan 15 '13 at 16:23

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted
double *f(int n, double v) 
{
  double *a, *p;
  a = malloc(n * sizeof(double));  // allocate memory enough for "n" doubles (an array)
  if (a != NULL)                   // if the allocation was successful
    for (p = a; p < a + n; p++)    // loop from the beginning of the array to the end
      *p = v;                // fill every element of the array with the value "v"
  return a;                  // return the new array
}

So if I called this function:

double * myarray;
myarray = f(3, 1.3);

Now I have:

myarray[0] = 1.3
myarray[1] = 1.3
myarray[2] = 1.3

So to answers your questions:

Can you explain me what this function is needed for?

  • allocates and initializes an array of doubles.

Does it copy the content of v in n?

  • No. Considering v is a double and n is an int, that doesn't even make sense. It makes an array n large and initializes it with the value v.

If yes, why does it return a?

  • It returns a so you have a reference to the newly created array. (see example above on how it could be used)
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It returns a newly allocated double array of size n filled with value v, or NULL if the allocation fails.

This loop:

for (p = a; p < a + n; p++)
    *p = v;

uses pointer arithmetic. As p is a pointer to a double, incrementing it will point to the next double to write. *p = v writes the double at the specified location.

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It allocates an array of n doubles, initialising each element of the array to the value of v.

The function returns a to allow the caller to use this newly allocated array.

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It allocs a memory area of n * sizeof(double) bytes and enterely fill it with v value

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This is a bit misleading, since it makes it sound as if v is a byte, which it really isn't. –  unwind Jan 15 '13 at 15:58

Allocate an array of n doubles in heap, fill it with v and return the pointer to it?

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Duplicate the v n times into an array of float

The array is allocated in the function and contains n float elements.

at the end of the function each element in the array a is containing v as value

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