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class C3 {
    public static int n = 0;
    public int m = 0;

    public C3() {
        n++; 
        m++; 
    }

    public void display() {
        System.out.println(n + " " + m);}
    }
}

Execution of: -

C3 c1 = new C3(); 
c1.display(); 
C3 c2 = new C3(); 
c1.display(); 
c2.display();   

Prints numbers (output)

1 1 
2 1 
2 1

Can anyone please explain me the output step by step? i am a bit confused about the 2nd line of output, why didn't both m and n value increase? also in 3rd output why didn't it start from beginning?

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3  
If you go step by step through the code in your debugger you will be able to answer your own question. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Jan 15 '13 at 15:46

6 Answers 6

m isn't static. That means that you have a different variable for each instance.

When you execute new C3();,

  • you create a new instance of the class C3,
  • you increment the static variable n (shared by all instances)
  • you create a new variable m, initialized to 0,
  • and you increment m but only for your new instance.
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thanks, but i need a bit explanation. –  Shaon Hasan Jan 15 '13 at 15:47
    
Consider looking into an "object oriented Java tutorial". I'm sure Google searching those words will come up with some. These are important concepts to master for Java; simply understanding this one piece will not be sufficient for you. –  BlackVegetable Jan 15 '13 at 15:50

n is a static variable, thus all instances(c1 and c2 in this case) of the class share its data, where as m isn't a static variable, that means, each instance gets its own value of m

 //initial vals n=0 m=0;
  C3 c1 = new C3(); 
 //value of n is 1 value of m is 1   
 c1.display();


//initial values n=0, m=1(as c1 just incremented n which is static and c2 will now inc      n's current value(which is 1))    
C3 c2 = new C3(); 
//value of n is 2 value of m is 1 
c1.display(); 
c2.display();  
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n is a static variable, as a result its scope is the class, not the instance.

m, on the other hand, is an instance variable and only has an existence within an instance.

As a result, each time you initialize a new C3(), m is set to 1 (since it is a new m), but n gets incremented each time (since all instances share it).

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For c1 and c2, only one n is available since n is static.But both will b ehaving separate m's since m is not static.

C3 c1 = new C3(); now m=1 and n=1 (m belongs to c1 and n belongs to class) C3 c2 = new C3(); now m=1 and n=2 (m belongs to c1 and n belongs to class)

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Everytime you create an object, same n is incremented.But in the case of m, each object will be having an indidual m which will be zero when object is created –  Renjith Jan 15 '13 at 15:52

Every object you instantiate will have m = 1 because m is an instance variable. n, on the other hand, is a class variable. Every object you instantiate will increase the n by 1.

In your case, n will count how many objects you have created.

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class C3 {
public static int n = 0; //static or class variable, n does not become 0 after every new instance
public int m = 0; //instance variable, m becomes 0 for every instance

public C3() {
    n++; //n becomes the "last value the class had for n" + 1
    m++; //m becomes 1
}

public void display() {
    System.out.println(n + " " + m);}
}

}

Always look at a static variable as a class variable, so you will only instance it with 0 the first time.

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