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The year is 2009 and SQL Server does not have CREATE OR ALTER/REPLACE. This is what I do instead.

IF EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.ROUTINES WHERE ROUTINE_NAME = 'SynchronizeRemoteCatalog' AND ROUTINE_SCHEMA = 'dbo' AND ROUTINE_TYPE = 'PROCEDURE')
 EXEC ('DROP PROCEDURE dbo.SynchronizeRemoteCatalog')

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.SynchronizeRemoteCatalog
AS BEGIN
    -- body
END

For triggers, you have to lean on the proprietary system views.

Is this the most accepted convention in the meantime?

EDIT: As n8wrl suggested, the official word suggests that this feature is not a high priority. Hence the question.

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2  
Another approach is CREATE/ALTER (arguably better), which is illustrated in my answer below. I'm leaving this note here, because most people don't read beyond the accepted answer. – Neolisk Jan 15 '15 at 19:02

11 Answers 11

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Yes, that's what all of my build scripts look like. At the end I set the permissions as well.

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I've always wanted this feature too, but for now, this is what mine look like as well. – SqlRyan Sep 16 '09 at 16:49
1  
Well, then the motion is passed. Seems the best we can do in the meantime (and I doubt I'll still be using SQL Server when and if it gets this feature), is to write good editor macros to make this easier. – harpo Sep 16 '09 at 17:02
3  
This answer is more of a comment. @neolisk's answer below seems to show a better way ... – noelicus Jan 20 '15 at 14:58

This article makes a good point about losing permissions when dropping an object in SQL server.

So here is the approach which retains permissions:

IF OBJECT_ID('spCallSomething') IS NULL
    EXEC('CREATE PROCEDURE spCallSomething AS SET NOCOUNT ON;')
GO

ALTER PROCEDURE spCallSomething ... 
--instead of DROP/CREATE

Also works for functions, just replace PROCEDURE with FUNCTION in the above code.

Another reason to consider doing it this way is tolerance to failure. Suppose your DROP succeeds, but your CREATE fails - you end with a broken DB. Using ALTER approach, you will end up with an older version of the object.

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1  
Yep, that's exactly how I've been doing it for a while now (except the AS SET NOCOUNT ON, that's an interesting twist). Come to think of it, I should set up a yasnippet for this pattern because I type it so much. – harpo Jan 15 '15 at 19:17
    
I have written templates to deal with the creating of missing stored procedures, scalar functions and table functions, with good success. – Dan Apr 15 at 21:47
    
However, the syntax is incorrect if you "just replace PROCEDURE with FUNCTION". I have posted our examples below. – Dan Apr 15 at 22:16

Every time a developer writes IF EXISTS(...) DROP a seal pup is clubbed. You should know exactly what's in the database and your upgrade script should do the CREATe or ALTER as appropiate, based on the current version of your application schema: Version Control and your Database.

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5  
why? Better be safe than sorry! Have you never had a script fail on you and suddenly a sproc you were about to drop is still lingering around in the database? I'd always do a IF EXISTS() check first - just to be on the safe side! Have you never had a silly temp-DBA run some of your scripts several times instead of just once?? – marc_s Sep 16 '09 at 16:56
10  
I find this to be a reasonable approach to allowing my deployment scripts to be run many times safely. Besides, if I can club a seal without getting cold... – n8wrl Sep 16 '09 at 16:57
    
@marc_s: this is less of risk if you have strong controls and rely on ALTER (like we do). Any script I give to the DBAs is either safe to run multiple times or it's atomic so it errors out second time. – gbn Sep 16 '09 at 16:58
2  
I guess I don't live in the ideal world. What do I say if a script raises an error on a client's machine, even after versioning and testing? "Too bad. It should work, so I can't help." I'd be out of business, Remus. – harpo Sep 16 '09 at 17:00
1  
@marc: yes, silly dbas... I'm just trying to pland a seed here, get ppl to think at the db more as a resource under version control rather than the 'lets open ssms and modify out table!'. I know in practice is impossible not to rely on if exists() (or objec_id is not null, which I actually prefer, like gbn). I guess seal pups are doomed... arctic vile pest – Remus Rusanu Sep 16 '09 at 17:01

I'd use OBJECT_ID(...) IS NOT NULL before a DROP.

Object identifiers have to be unique, so it works without using system tables:

CREATE TRIGGER dbo.ExistingTable ON dbo.AnotherTable FOR UPDATE
AS 
SET NOCOUNT ON
GO

gives

Msg 2714, Level 16, State 2, Procedure MetaClass, Line 3
There is already an object named ExistingTable ' in the database.

I normally use ALTER because of how we work with source control, etc.

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I finally get what you're saying here... and while OBJECT_ID is also proprietary, this is a much more compact way to perform the check. – harpo Sep 16 '09 at 20:24
    
I did not know OBJECT_ID is proprietary... it's probably in Sybase too though – gbn Sep 17 '09 at 5:31
    
How would you write the query? If object id is not null then what? Drop object? Is there such a statement in T-SQL? – Neolisk Oct 22 '15 at 11:31

We encountered a situation where we needed to update a remote site, but we didn’t have DROP permissions. Until now, we have been using the ‘DROP and CREATE’ script built into SSMS 2008 R2, but now we needed to change. We created three templates, which we drop above the appropriate ALTER scripts when we need to update a stored procedure or function:

—- Stored Procedure
IF OBJECT_ID('[dbo].[<Name_Of_Routine, , >]') IS NULL
EXEC('CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[<Name_Of_Routine, , >] AS SET NOCOUNT ON;')
EXEC('GRANT EXECUTE ON [<Name_Of_Routine, , >] TO Public AS dbo;')
GO

—- Scalar Function
IF OBJECT_ID('[dbo].[<Name_Of_Routine, , >]') IS NULL
EXEC('CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[<Name_Of_Routine, , >] (@i INT) RETURNS INT AS BEGIN RETURN 0 END;')
EXEC('GRANT EXECUTE ON [<Name_Of_Routine, , >] TO Public AS dbo;')
GO

—- Table-based Function
IF OBJECT_ID('[dbo].[<Name_Of_Routine, , >]') IS NULL
EXEC('CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[<Name_Of_Routine, , >] (@i INT) RETURNS @O TABLE(i INT) AS BEGIN INSERT INTO @O SELECT 0 RETURN END;')
GO

Any special permissions get scripted after each CREATE (Table functions cannot be assigned permissions). After that, the ALTER doesn’t change it, and if they add or modify the permissions, they remain. Doing it this way, it’s an easy task to copy the name of the function or stored procedure, and use the Template Parameter replacement to automating the completion of these scriptlets.

Now, I’m hoping that the good folks at Microsoft will either add this to their “Script ___ as” lists, or give us the ability to create our own such that this scripting comes ‘baked-in’

You may want to throw some weight behind the SQL Server feedback entry at: https://connect.microsoft.com/SQLServer/feedback/details/344991/create-or-alter-statement. It seems to be one of the few that are still accessible publicly, and they state that they "have started a feasibility review for this to decide if we can ship this in the near future." The more voices, the more likely this will happen!

(Update: now also using the following code for Triggers and Views)

-- Triggers
IF OBJECT_ID('[dbo].[<Name_Of_Trigger, , >]') IS NULL -- Check if Trigger Exists
    EXEC('CREATE TRIGGER [dbo].[<Name_Of_Trigger, , >] ON [<Name_Of_Table, , >] AFTER UPDATE AS SET NOCOUNT ON;') -- Create dummy/empty SP
GO

-- Views
IF OBJECT_ID('[dbo].[<Name_Of_View, , >]') IS NULL -- Check if View Exists
    EXEC('CREATE VIEW [dbo].[<Name_Of_View, , >] AS SELECT 1;') -- Create dummy/empty View
GO
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Looks like it's a while off: link text

typical script for me:

IF EXISTS (SELECT name FROM sysobjects WHERE name = 'ig_InsertDealer' AND type = 'P')
    DROP PROC dbo.ig_InsertDealer
GO 
CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.ig_InsertDealer
...
GO
GRANT EXECUTE ON dbo.ig_InsertDealer TO ...
GO
share|improve this answer
2  
I would recommend using a) the "sys" schema, and b) a more focused system view, e.g. sys.tables for tables, sys.triggers for triggers etc., instead of just the generic "sysobjects" (which will be deprecated soonish). – marc_s Sep 16 '09 at 16:50

That's basically the way to do it, yes. I just wonder if you have a particular reason to use the "EXEC" approach:

IF EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.ROUTINES WHERE ROUTINE_NAME = 'SynchronizeRemoteCatalog' AND ROUTINE_SCHEMA = 'dbo' AND ROUTINE_TYPE = 'PROCEDURE')
    EXEC ('DROP PROCEDURE dbo.SynchronizeRemoteCatalog')

Why not just:

IF EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.ROUTINES WHERE ROUTINE_NAME = 'SynchronizeRemoteCatalog' AND ROUTINE_SCHEMA = 'dbo' AND ROUTINE_TYPE = 'PROCEDURE')
    DROP PROCEDURE dbo.SynchronizeRemoteCatalog

???

For triggers, there's sys.triggers. Those are system catalog views in the "sys" schema - not strictly or directly tables, really.

Marc

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1  
I started using EXEC because sometimes when I sent the script to clients where the objects did not exist, SQL Server would complain. Maybe it's superstition, but it hasn't hurt anything. – harpo Sep 16 '09 at 16:55
    
@harpo: thanks for the explanation – marc_s Sep 16 '09 at 17:03

I'll use either depending on context: my initial-build or major refactoring scripts will use check/drop/create, pure maintenance scripts use alter.

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The year is 2009 and SQL Server does not have CREATE OR ALTER/REPLACE.

The year is 2016 and it does now have DIE (Drop If Exists).

I mention it in case people find it useful but the caveats around needing to re-apply permissions with this approach still apply.

DROP PROCEDURE IF EXISTS dbo.SynchronizeRemoteCatalog

GO

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.SynchronizeRemoteCatalog
AS
  BEGIN
      BODY:
  END 
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I have a template, which allows to execute a script several times without errors.

IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM sys.objects WHERE object_id = OBJECT_ID(N'[aaa_test]') AND type in (N'P', N'PC'))
    EXEC('CREATE PROCEDURE aaa_test AS')
    EXEC('GRANT EXECUTE ON aaa_test TO someone')
GO

ALTER PROCEDURE aaa_test 
     @PAR1 INT,
     @PAR2 INT=0
AS
BEGIN
    SELECT @PAR1 AS Par1, CASE @PAR2 WHEN 0 THEN 'Default' ELSE 'Other' END AS Par2
END
GO

Execution:

EXEC aaa_test 1
EXEC aaa_test 1,5
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You should not drop an object. Dropping an object suffers from two problems:

1) If the CREATE fails, you no longer have an object. (You can use transactions to avoid that, at the expense of a lot of boilerplate code)

2) You lose permissions on the object, if you do not explicitly re-create them.


I prefer to create a blank object within an "if not exists" condition, and then use ALTER, and have written helper procedures for that purpose.

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