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I am writing a Flask site for which I would like to have routes like this:

@app.route('/')
@app.route('/<page_id>')
@app.route('/<page_id>/<subpage_id>')
def page(page_id=None, subpage_id=None):
    ...

While it seems like this should work in theory, it looks like this actually breaks static resources located in the root static/ directory. I assume the reason for this is that my dynamic route actually matches 'static/style.css' and thus overrides the normal handler for static files.

Is there any way around this? Is there a 'static' handler I can forward the request to if I detect that page_id=='static'?

Edit: Here is a working sample

@app.route('/<page_id>/<subpage_id>/<subsubpage_id>')
def xxx(page_id=None, subpage_id=None, subsubpage_id=None):
    return 'hello'

If you open http://127.0.0.1:5000/static/css/style.css now you should get a 'hello' instead of the file.

share|improve this question
    
If those variables are guaranteed to be ints, you can specify that in the route and that should help you. Otherwise, I'm not sure why this would be happening. – sigmavirus24 Jan 15 '13 at 19:46
    
They are not ints unfortunately. I have just added a sample, if you insert that into the usual Flask skeleton the URL to the CSS should no longer work. – Nils Jan 15 '13 at 20:13
2  
are you literally capturing /<page>/<subpage>/<subsubpage>? what's the point of using routing if you have one function do everything? – Eevee Jan 15 '13 at 21:33
    
Yes. I have Page objects in my database, which I load and display based on the page_id/subpage_id/subsubpage_id when the method is called. Is there a better way to do this? I was thinking of adding separate routes for each of the pages when the app is initialized, but I could not find a good way of making that work in conjunction with url_for. – Nils Jan 15 '13 at 22:07
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Regarding the root of your problem:

Yes. I have Page objects in my database, which I load and display based on the page_id/subpage_id/subsubpage_id when the method is called. Is there a better way to do this? I was thinking of adding separate routes for each of the pages when the app is initialized, but I could not find a good way of making that work in conjunction with url_for.

You can register route handlers directly by using app.add_url_rule. It will use the function's name for url_for by default, yes, but you can override that by passing an endpoint argument.

So maybe you'd have something like this:

from functools import partial

def actual_handler(page):
    return u'hello'

for page in session.query(Page):
    route = u'/{0}/{1}/{2}'.format(page.id1, page.id2, page.id3)
    app.add_url_rule(
        route,
        page.name,  # this is the name used for url_for
        partial(actual_handler, page=page),
    )

Getting the session may or may not be tricky, and may or may not involve work like manually calling session.remove(); I haven't tried using SQLAlchemy outside a Flask handler before. Assuming you're using SQLA in the first place.

Also see the documentation on route handling.

As for the original question of routes taking priority over static files, I genuinely don't know; based on my reading of the Flask and Werkzeug docs, that shouldn't happen. If you still wish to solve this by manually serving static files, perhaps send_from_directory will help. Presumably your web server will serve static files directly in production, anyway, so it might not be worth the metaprogramming gunk above.

PS: An afterthought; Pyramid's traversal might be a better fit if your entire site lives in a database. It examines path components one at a time dynamically, rather than having a fixed list of static routes.

share|improve this answer
    
I think I got this to work, thank you! I don't understand why I need to get the session at all though. Why can't I just do db = SQLAlchemy(app) and then for page in Page.query.all(): ...? – Nils Jan 16 '13 at 23:51
    
you don't, really; Page.query is a shortcut for session.query(Page). i just like to use the vanilla SQLA approach as much as possible; it doesn't make sense to me that a table could query itself :) – Eevee Jan 16 '13 at 23:54

This is a horrible hack but you could probably just do something akin to:

@app.route('/<page_id>/<subpage_id>/<subsubpage_id>')
def xxx(page_id=None, subpage_id=None, subsubpage_id=None):
    if page_id == 'static':  # or whatever the path is to your assets
       # make a response where you've filled the request yourself
    return 'hello'
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, as I mentioned in my original post I could do this if I knew what the default handler for static resource requests was, so that I could forward the request correcly. Do you know? – Nils Jan 16 '13 at 19:41

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