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While utilizing new features of C++10 on some old code, I ended up with the problem that I cannot call make_shared that takes 12 parameters. I remember Microsoft's STL talking how they use emulation for make_shared and that 10 is maximum. Obviously refactoring code just for this is out of the question, so basically my question is - Is there a way to get more than 10 params to make_shared in VS 2010.

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Try adding /D_VARIADIC_MAX=12 to the compiler options. I remember reading you can only increase it to 10, but it's worth a shot. –  Praetorian Jan 15 '13 at 17:29
4  
Shades of Spinal Tap… –  Potatoswatter Jan 15 '13 at 18:12
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@Praetorian blogs.msdn.com/b/vcblog/archive/2011/09/12/10209291.aspx says the limit is 5 to 10 inclusive. –  IronMensan Jan 15 '13 at 18:49
7  
"Obviously refactoring code just for this is out of the question" How about refactoring the code because a constructor with 10 parameters is clearly begging for some refactoring? –  Nicol Bolas Jan 15 '13 at 20:59
    
@NicolBolas actually no. I dont want to give away expert trade secrets(of the gurus that wrote 12 arg ctor class :D) but trust me it is not a regular class, more like a msg. :D –  NoSenseEtAl Jan 15 '13 at 22:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted
make_shared<foobar>(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12);

can be replaced with

shared_ptr<foobar>(new foobar(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12));

In C++11, std::make_shared is actually a performance optimization over creating an object using the second method, because it only performs one memory allocation instead of two, but once you get past 10 variables, you don't have much choice about which to use.

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Doh, Im so stupid... shared_ptr<T> doesnt care about number of T ctor args, only fake variadics in make_shared are the limit... tnx applied and testing it now, from what I see it works. :) –  NoSenseEtAl Jan 18 '13 at 12:10
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make_shared is also useful for writing exception-safe code. If you use this way, give every shared_ptr a name, don't pass them around as temporaries. –  aschepler Jan 20 '13 at 13:30

If you really want to use make_shared for its efficiency advantages then you can still do so:

#include <tuple>
#include <memory>
#include <redi/index_tuple.h>

template<typename X, typename... Args>
  std::shared_ptr<X>
  make_shared_TO_THE_MAX(Args&&... args)
  {
    struct Wrapper
    {
      X x;

      template<typename... T>
        Wrapper(std::tuple<T...> targs) : Wrapper(targs, to_index_tuple<T...>{}) { }

      template<typename T, unsigned... I>
        Wrapper(T targs, index_tuple<I...>) : x(std::get<I>(targs)) { }
    };

    auto wrapped = std::make_shared<Wrapper>(std::forward_as_tuple(std::forward<Args>(args)...));
    return std::shared_ptr<X>(wrapped, &wrapped->x);
  }

This bundles up the constructor arguments into a tuple of references and passes that to make_shared, so it doesn't matter that make_shared can't handle 10 arguments because it only gets one. Instead of make_shared<X> it uses make_shared<Wrapper> which will allocate space for a Wrapper (which is the same size and layout as its member of type X) and construct it with the argument tuple. The Wrapper constructor delegates to another constructor which expands the tuple to pass to the X constructor.

Finally, it uses the shared_ptr aliasing constructor to return a shared_ptr<X> that shares ownership with the shared_ptr<Wrapper> but stores the address of the X object.

<redi/index_tuple.h> is my own header but I'm trying to get something similar standardised for C++14.

This can be done without variadic templates too, but is more work. Here it is for two arguments, just add ten more for twelve!

#include <tuple>
#include <memory>

template<typename X, typename Arg0, typename Arg1>
  std::shared_ptr<X>
  make_shared_TO_THE_MAX(Arg0&& arg0, Arg1&& arg1)
  {
    struct Wrapper
    {
      X x;

      template<typename T0, typename T1>
        Wrapper(std::tuple<T0, T1> targs)
        : x(std::get<0>(targs), std::get<1>(targs)) { }
    };

    auto wrapped = std::make_shared<Wrapper>(std::forward_as_tuple(std::forward<Arg0>(arg0), std::forward<Arg1>(arg1)));
    return std::shared_ptr<X>(wrapped, &wrapped->x);
  }
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wait, isnt ... var templates? If so then :( because :" Is there a way to get more than 10 params to make_shared in VS 2010." –  NoSenseEtAl Jan 21 '13 at 9:23
    
It doesn't pass more than 10 params to make_shared, that's the point. But it does use variadics. I was thinking the compiler supported variadics but the stdlib didn't, but I think that's only true for the latest compiler update. You could still do the trick above without variadics, just manually list the 12 arguments your type needs and then explicitly unpack the tuple with std::get<0>(t), std::get<1>(t), std::get<2>(t), etc. If tuple also has a limit of ten you'd need to pass two tuples. –  Jonathan Wakely Jan 21 '13 at 9:42

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