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I have the following code:

private def hasRole(role: String): Boolean = {
  var hasRole = false;
  if(getUserDetails.isDefined){

    // getAuthorities returns java.util.Collection<GrantedAuthority>
    val authorities: util.Collection[_ <:GrantedAuthority] = getUserDetails.get.getAuthorities
    // Wrap the collection is a Scala class 
    val authoritiesWrapper = JCollectionWrapper.apply(authorities);
    for(authority <- authoritiesWrapper.iterator){
      if(authority.getAuthority == role){
        hasRole = true;
        scala.util.control.Breaks.break  
      }
    }
  }
  hasRole
}

The question is, is scala.util.control.Breaks.break the correct way toreturn when I've found the role? Doesn't look right to me.

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1  
Well, first of all, you haven't set the scope of the break. You need to have a breakable { } clause surrounding the code that you will break from. –  adchilds Jan 15 '13 at 17:45
    
Also what does _ <:GrantedAuthority mean? I got this from IntelliJ's code complete. <-- post as separate question. I'm removing from this one. –  AAA Jan 15 '13 at 17:47

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If you want to use breakable, you need to do it like so:

import scala.util.control.Breaks._
breakable {
  for (i <- 0 to 10000) { if (i>3) break }
}

But if you find yourself doing that often, you're probably not using the collections library to its full extent. Try instead

authoritiesWrapper.iterator.exists(_.getAuthority == role)

Also, in the example you gave, you could also

if (authority.getAuthority == role) return true

When to choose which? In general, you should use the control-flow options in the collections library if you can. They generally are the fastest and clearest. Wait, fastest--why is that? Both break and return (from within a for or other context that requires a closure--basically anything but if and while and match) actually throw a stackless exception which is caught; in the break case it's caught by breakable and in the return case it's caught by the method. Creating a stack trace is really slow, but even stackless exceptions are kind of slow.

So using the correct collections method--exists in this case--is the best solution.

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Thanks for your answer. +1. I've put my refactored code in a separate answer below. –  Adam Davies Jan 16 '13 at 9:28

The question is, is scala.util.control.Breaks.break the correct way toreturn when I've found the role? Doesn't look right to me.

Since your just looking for the first instance of authority.getAuthority == role you can use find which does exactly that and is the idiomatic way to do this.

authoritiesWrapper.iterator.find(authority => authority.getAuthority == role)

or more concisely

authoritiesWrapper.iterator.find(_.getAuthority == role)

These return an Option type which you can get the value of authority from if it exists.

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This returns Option[_ <:GrantedAuthority]. Do I then need to end my method with option.isDefined? –  Adam Davies Jan 15 '13 at 17:55
    
Yes, I think isDefined would provide the same logic you have with for and scala.util.control.Breaks.break –  Brian Jan 15 '13 at 17:57

Why not just return true and return false replacing hasRole?

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Most saliently because return returns from methods only. If you use it in a function literal (typically an argument to a HOF in the standard library) you don't return from that function, you return from the method in which the HOF is called! –  Randall Schulz Jan 15 '13 at 18:03
    
@Randall Schulz I still wonder how I should break a parallel collection traverse. Break does not work. –  idonnie Jan 15 '13 at 21:34
1  
@idonnie: I don't think it's even meaningful to put a break in the "work" function passed to a parallel collection HOF. If what you want to do is "race" several alternative and concurrent code paths to a single solution among many, Futures would work better for you. I seem to recall a pattern that creates that sort of a race-to-the-answer parallelism using Futures, but I can't recall what it was specifically or where I saw it. –  Randall Schulz Jan 15 '13 at 23:43

I can only offer you generalities, but I hope it's at least a little helpful...

Unfortunately, your sample code contains free identifiers, so it's not possible for me to understand what it does without guessing and assuming.

You're thinking about the problem wrong. What is it you're doing here? You're finding a element of a collection. Use the library! It has all manner of such things off-the-shelf.

When it comes to dealing with Option[Something] the preferred approach is to map over it. If it's a None, you get a None out. If it's Some(thing) then the function you pass to map will be applied to thing and the result will be Some(what-your-function-returned-for-thing).

Alternatively, and what newcomers to Scala often find more palatable, you can use pattern matching on an Option to effectively distinguish the None case from the Some(thing) case.

When it comes to dealing with Java libraries, it's best to push the conversions from and to the Java collections to the very periphery of your code and keep the bulk of your code idiomatic Scala using native Scala collections.

The same goes for nulls coming from Java. Turn them into Option at the earliest possible time. As a convenience, the Option(thing) factory will turn a thing that is null into a None and wrap a non-null thing in a Some

Addendum

The upshot is that you really should not be using these control flow mechanisms in this code. They're all based on exceptions (other than return) and are rather at odds with Scala's emphasis on using functional programming. The library supports a clean, succinct, efficient implementation of the essetial logic you're trying for. Don't go against the grain like this.

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Thanks Everyone, based on @Rex Kerr answer I now have this:

private def hasRole(role: String): Boolean = {
  var hasRole: Boolean = false;
  if(getUserDetails.isDefined){
    val authorities: util.Collection[_ <:GrantedAuthority] = getUserDetails.get.getAuthorities
    val authoritiesWrapper = JCollectionWrapper.apply(authorities);
    hasRole = authoritiesWrapper.iterator.exists(_.getAuthority == role)
  }
  hasRole
}

which seems to look and feel right. I'm using exists to see of the role exists in the collection and then returning that result. By default false is returned if the user is not defined (not logged in).

Please comment if this is still not perfect.

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The hasRole var serves no purpose. You could simply delete it and have if (getUserDetails..) {...} else false (and instead of setting hasRole in the if-statement. And you create longwinded val names for no apparent reason (as documentation?). Also, since getUserDetails is an option, you'd normally let it do the logic (with its exist method) instead of adding the if/else: hasRole(role: String) = getUserDetails.exists{ ud => val auth: util.Collection[_ <: GrantedAuthority] = ud.getAuthorities; JCollectionWrapper(auth).iterator.exists(_.getAuthority == role) } –  Rex Kerr Jan 16 '13 at 17:32

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