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I have followed this way of handling exception in my application. But my lead said I am doing it wrong. I am simply wrapping and rethrowing the same exception, which will impact performance.

What is wrong with my approach? Does anyone have any suggestions on how I can log and handle the exception here?

public class BusinessRepository : IBusinessRepo
{
    public List<Employee> GetEmployees()
    {
        try
        {
            //do some DB operations
        }
        catch (SQLException sqlex)
        {
            Logger.Log("Exception detail with full stack trace");
            throw new DALException(sqlex, "Error in data access layer");
        }

    }
}
public class BusinessLayerClass : IBusinessLayer
{
    private readonly IBusinessRepo Repo;
    public BusinessLayerClass(IBusinessRepo rep)
    {
        Repo = rep;
    }
    public List<Employee> GetEmployees()
    {
        try
        {
           List<Employee> emps= return Repo.GetEmployees();
        }
        catch (DALException dex)
        {
            //do nothin as it got already logged
            throw;
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Logger.Log(ex, "Business layer ex");
            throw new BusinessLayerEx(ex);
        }
    }
}

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        try
        {
            List < Employee >= BusinessLayerClass.GetEmployees();

        }
        catch (DALException)
        {
            //show error msg to user
        }
        catch (BusinessLayerEx)
        {
            //show error msg to user
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Logger.Log();
            //show error msg to user
        }
        return View(emps);
    }
 }

Do i follow right way of bubbling and handling and logging shown above?

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2  
According to john skeet performance is hardly impacted by exception throwing. see: developerfusion.com/article/5250/… –  albertjan Jan 15 '13 at 18:06
2  
Since exception should be exceptional, does it matter much? –  emartel Jan 15 '13 at 18:08
    
@albertjan I agree on Jon Skeet. But is my approach is correct way to handle and log? –  Billa Jan 15 '13 at 18:08
    
What I find truly staggering is the assertion "it got already logged", and I don't mean the grammar. This can only mean there's another try-catch luring in the Repo. –  The Dag Jan 15 '13 at 18:18
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4 Answers 4

I'm inclined to agree with your way of doing this, as long as two conditions are met:

  1. Your Logger.Log statements log something more meaningful/useful than what you've indicated here (I'm guessing your code here is just a sample message indicating the error is logged). If it provides information you can use to track down the cause of the exception, good.
  2. Your //show error msg to user comments mean that in that location, you render a nice view explaining that an error has occured, and you aren't just showing a default exception screen/strack trace.

As far as your throw; when you catch the DALException you just threw: that's fine. Your goal here seems to be to catch any exception coming out of the previous layer and log it, throwing your own exception afterwards. Since DALException will only be thrown if you've already logged another error and thrown it yourself, it's perfectly fine to let it bubble up past this level.

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The general rule of thumb for exceptions is do not catch them unless you can "do something about it", i.e. add value. Ideally this would be some kind of graceful recovery to the point that the user never knows there was a hiccup, but at the very minimum this would include logging the exception -- which you are doing.

Do not catch an exception only to immediately re-throw it. That adds no value. (An exception to this might be if you need to change the type of exception to something more informative/appropriate to the context).

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He's catching an exception doing something (either mutating it or logging information) and then re-throwing it, he's not catching it to do nothing but re-throw the same exception, so this doesn't apply. –  Servy Jan 15 '13 at 18:32
    
The catch-then-rethrow piece of code is just there to filter out one specific type of exception from the "catch, log, throw new exception" block following it (because that type of exception only gets thrown there if the problem has already been logged). –  Jim Jan 15 '13 at 18:46
    
@Servy No, he was catching it and doing literally NOTHING other than throw it again. He even put a comment in there stating both that he deliberately does nothing and why - "it's already logged". –  The Dag Jan 15 '13 at 18:46
    
It is however almost always a good idea to put in place some centralized exception logging. I wish people would not use the term "handle" for absolutely anything that catches an exception, because there really ought to be a bit more to it than that. ;) –  The Dag Jan 15 '13 at 18:48
    
@TheDag He was catching it and rethrowing so he could prevent it from being logged twice. Do you have any alternatives that would result in the same behaviour? –  Maarten Jan 15 '13 at 18:49
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Throwing and catching exceptions is expensive compared to any normal return mechanism, but it's kind of besides the point - we're not supposed to use exceptions as normal control-flow mechanisms, but to handle exceptional things.

Exception handling can be quite challenging technically. After all, most of the time we exactly don't expect them. But what can make it near-impossible to get exception handling "right" is when the team or project simply doesn't have any kind of strategy for error handling. In an ideal world, we would know at the outset exactly what sort of error conditions we need to cope with, and we'd design the whole application with those in mind (along with the gazillion other constraints we also need to keep in mind, from code readability to performance).

I'd say if your lead says "this is wrong" then it's fair to ask "what's our error-handling strategy?". If you don't even know what purpose your code is supposed to fulfill, how can you possibly deliver great code?

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There's nothing wrong with your approach but I don't see that your custom exceptions add much value. A example of how wrapping an exception in the DAL could add value is if you wrapped specific SQL exceptions, such as unique key violation, in a custom exception so that your UI could present a meaningful error message.

As for performance, it doesn't really matter anyway because something very bad has already happened.

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