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I am outputting a fairly long listing of CIL through Reflection.Emit. I do not need the process of generating assembly to be fast, but I do need the generated assembly to run as quickly as possible, as I am generating the inner loop of a game.

I have already found tiny local optimizations to remove redundant instructions such as Dup followed by Pop, but I am wondering if there exists some automated library that is capable of performing common optimizations on such generated functions.

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Have you verified that these optimizations are not already taken care of by the JIT compiler? –  Brian Rasmussen Jan 15 '13 at 17:54
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Removing dup/pop and similar IL-level changes often don't affect the optimized JITted code much, in my experience. Sometimes you eliminate several instructions but the x86 looks exactly the same. So be careful not to waste too much time "optimizing" with no performance benefit. –  romkyns Jan 15 '13 at 17:56
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@romkyns +1 - And you have to be very careful, because sometimes you can accidentally change the code enough that the JIT doesn't see a possible optimization for a block of code anymore, and end up with slower x86 code... –  Reed Copsey Jan 15 '13 at 18:01
    
How would I verify this, for assembly that never touches the disk? –  Giuseppe Maggiore Jan 16 '13 at 9:35
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@GiuseppeMaggiore your best bet is to ask a separate question, along the lines of "how do I see the optimized x86 output for an assembly I generate on the fly". Getting the right thing even for an on-disk assembly is a bit tricky, since VS defaults to not optimizing if the debugger is attached. –  romkyns Jan 17 '13 at 14:59

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but I am wondering if there exists some automated library that is capable of performing common optimizations on such generated functions.

For the most part, this is handled by the JIT at runtime. The best you can do is make your generated code efficient, and design it in a way that the JIT can optimize it as necessary at runtime.

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And how would I do that? I mean, what is the set of optimizations that the JIT is capable of doing? –  Giuseppe Maggiore Jan 16 '13 at 7:33
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@GiuseppeMaggiore Enabled unmanaged debugging, put in a break point, then use Debug->Windows->Disassembly –  Reed Copsey Jan 16 '13 at 17:27

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