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If I have the following code, where I allocate my memory in the main function and then pass it to a function, which fills it for me like this:

main()
{
    char *bar = (char*) malloc(sizeof(char));

    while(1)
    {
        foo(bar);
        free(bar);
        bar = (char*) malloc(sizeof(char));
    }
}

foo(char *bar)
{
    int c;
    int i = 0;
    while((c = getchar()) != '\n' && c != EOF)
    {
        bar[i++] = c;
        bar = (char*) realloc(bar, sizeof(char) * (i+1));
    }
}

I get a segfault after a few inputs. If I do this however:

main()
{
    char *bar;

    while(1)
    {
        bar = foo();
        free(bar);
    }
}

char *foo()
{
    char *bar = (char*) malloc(sizeof(char));
    int c;
    int i = 0;
    while((c = getchar()) != '\n' && c != EOF)
    {
        bar[i++] = c;
        bar = (char*) realloc(bar, sizeof(char) * (i+1));
    }

    return bar;
}

, i.e. put the memory allocation to the function, everything seems to work fine. Why is that?

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side note: You shouldn't assign the same pointer that you pass into realloc –  Mike Jan 15 '13 at 18:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is quite expected behaviour. realloc() may or may not "move" the pointer you pass into it to a new address. If that happens, it also free()'s the original address. Since C is pass-by-value and not pass-by-reference, the bar pointer in your main() function will still refer to the old address, and you'll effectively do a double free (and the realloc()'d pointer will be lost).

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C is a pass-by-value language. Your modifications to bar inside foo() don't affect the bar outside that function call. To do what you're trying to do, you need to change that parameter to be char **bar and use it as *bar inside of foo().

A couple of editorial notes:

  1. You don't need to cast the return value of malloc() or realloc() in C.

  2. Don't assign to the same pointer you pass into realloc(). If it fails, you'll get a memory leak.

  3. sizeof(char) is 1, why bother with the extra typing?

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You could be freeing memory twice in the first case. The realloc call can hand you back another chunk of memory, in which case the first chunk (the one malloced in main) is freed.

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realloc will not always expand the same memory. Sometime it will allocate new chunk of memory if expansion is not possible.

main()
{
    char *bar = (char*) malloc(sizeof(char));

    while(1)
    {
        foo(&bar);
        free(bar);
        bar = (char*) malloc(sizeof(char));
    }
}

foo(char **dbar)
{
    char *bar = *dbar;
    int c;
    int i = 0;
    while((c = getchar()) != '\n' && c != EOF)
    {
        bar[i++] = c;
        bar = (char*) realloc(bar, sizeof(char) * (i+1));
    }
    *dbar = bar;
}
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