Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a data file that I need to use an input for a program, but I need to tweak the formatting a little. Using this method: Extracting specific data from a file and writing it to another file I generated a file that looks like this:

PITG_00002  2   397
PITG_00004  1   1275
PITG_00004  1397    1969
PITG_00005  200 1111
PITG_00005  1281    1646
PITG_00006  1   816
PITG_00009  2398    3276
PITG_00009  1536    1952
PITG_00010  1   537

I need to distinguish between data that comes from the same sequence (first column) and data that comes from different sequences, by adding a blank line in between sequences that are unique, so that it looks like:

PITG_00002  2   397

PITG_00004  1   1275
PITG_00004  1397    1969

PITG_00005  200 1111
PITG_00005  1281    1646

PITG_00006  1   816

PITG_00009  2398    3276
PITG_00009  1536    1952

PITG_00010  1   537

I tagged this with the program/coding options available to me. Any help you could give is much appreciated, thanks!

share|improve this question
    
I am what you would call an extreme beginner lol. I understand how to add a blank line between each line, but not how to selectively add them – user1784467 Jan 15 '13 at 19:34
up vote 3 down vote accepted
perl -pae 'print $/ if (defined $x && $x ne $F[0]); $x = $F[0];' input.txt

This will check the first field $F[0] against the previous field, stored in $x. If they are not the same, a newline is printed.

Explanations:

  • -p read file and print each line
  • -a autosplit lines on whitespace into @F array
  • $/ is your input record separator, default is newline.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the code and especially for the explanations. Thanks to the rest of the posters as well! – user1784467 Jan 15 '13 at 19:50
    
@user1784467 You're welcome. – TLP Jan 15 '13 at 19:51
    
@TLP : Is the defined check necessary? – Zaid Jan 16 '13 at 13:12
    
@Zaid Without it, it prints a newline on the first line, no matter what because $F[0] will never be empty or undefined. It would also cause a warning, if warnings were on. – TLP Jan 16 '13 at 21:04
$ perl -api -e 'print "\n" unless $seen{$F[0]}++ && $. > 1;' file.txt
share|improve this answer
    
+1 but this will only work if the first field does not appear again. – TLP Jan 15 '13 at 19:27
    
Hey this was pretty helpful. Ultimately I used the other code because I can't guarantee that that the first field won't appear again; I'm looking at coding sequences of DNA and there could be exons on the reverse strand that would have the same identifier but are ultimately unique. And there are about 9000 sequences so I can't check =P. thanks! – user1784467 Jan 15 '13 at 19:53

I don't have unix environment now so I cannot write code directly. I will tell you pseudo code.

 loop all lines
     read line
     var=`echo $line | cut -f 1 -d ' '` #P000_0002
     num=`echo $line | cut -f 2 -d '_'` #0002
     if ($prevnum != $num)
         echo "" >> newfile
     echo $line >> newfile
     prevnum = $num
 end loop
share|improve this answer

If you want to stick with Python. A similar result can be achieved using itertools.groupby

>>> with open("test.txt") as fin, open("test.out","w") as fout:
    groups = groupby(((e.split()[0],e) for e in fin),
             key = operator.itemgetter(0))
    for key, group in groups:
        fout.write('\n'.join(e[1] for e in group))
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.