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def set_attribute(attributes, name, value):
    for i, attribute in enumerate(attributes):
        if name in attribute:
            quote_char = attribute.find('"')
            if quote_char == -1:
                raise ValueError
                return None
            attributes[i] = attribute[:quote_char+1] + str(value) + '"'
            return attributes

I'm a new programmer and I'm trying to properly understand exception handling.

In this example every name should also have a " character in it somewhere, so I want to raise an exception if this fails, but I was also trying to understand if the return None statement is necessary (or does anything).

My understanding was that I would escape from each level of scope until an exception handler was found. The Python tutorial says this:

  • First, the try clause (the statement(s) between the try and except keywords) is executed.
  • If no exception occurs, the except clause is skipped and execution of the try statement is finished.
  • If an exception occurs during execution of the try clause, the rest of the clause is skipped. Then if its type matches the exception named after the except keyword, the except clause is executed, and then execution continues after the try statement.
  • If an exception occurs during execution of the try clause, the rest of the clause is skipped. Then if its type matches the exception named after the except keyword, the except clause is executed, and then execution continues after the try statement.
  • If an exception occurs which does not match the exception named in the except clause, it is passed on to outer try statements; if no handler is found, it is an unhandled exception and execution stops with a message as shown above.

Yet, after reading this description, I'm realizing that I don't understand exceptions, but I should.

So to state the question simply: is this return None statement necessary, and why? Also, where am I wrong about how exceptions work?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The return None is junk. Python will never get there.


You could simplify the code and run a little experiment to see if the value FOO is ever returned:

def foo():
    if True:
        raise ValueError('Bad value')
        return 'FOO'
    return 'BAR'

try:
    print(foo())
except ValueError as err:
    print(err)
    # Bad value

If FOO were returned, you might see it in print(foo()), but indeed that line prints nothing. Instead you see Bad value.

share|improve this answer
    
This makes sense to me because the exception handler is at the root level. You could apply the same concept to functions nested arbitrarily deep and have the exception at the root and it would still be handled at the root. That being the case, do you know what is the argument being made in the the link I provided? –  Ben Mordecai Jan 15 '13 at 20:05
    
Sorry, no. I do not understand that article well enough to comment on it. I think it is written from a Racket programmer's perspective and its main intent is to implement Python's try..except..finally behavior in Racket. Not knowing Racket, most of that article goes over my head. The try..except..finally examples at the beginning are goods ones to understand though! :) –  unutbu Jan 15 '13 at 20:51
    
Thanks for your help. So essentially I need to do some research on how finally works. –  Ben Mordecai Jan 15 '13 at 21:05

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