Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

#define d 10+10

int main()
{
    printf("%d",d*d);
return 0;
}

I am new to the concept of macros.I found the output for the above program to be 120.What is the logic behind it?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
2  
Use cpp source.c to see how is expanded –  Alter Mann Jan 15 '13 at 20:03
add comment

8 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Macros are replaced literally. Think of search/replace. The compiler sees your code as 10+10*10+10.

It is common practice to enclose macro replacement texts in parentheses for that reason:

#define d (10 + 10)

This is even more important when your macro is a function-like macro:

#define SQ(x) ((x) * (x))

Think of SQ(a + b)...

share|improve this answer
add comment
10+10*10+10 == 10 + 100 + 10

Is that clear?

share|improve this answer
add comment

d*d expands into 10+10*10+10. Multiplication comes before addition, so 10 + 100 + 10 = 120.

In general, #define expressions should always be parenthesized: #define d (10+10)

share|improve this answer
add comment

A macro is a nothing more than a simple text replacement, so your line:

printf("%d",d*d);

becomes

printf("%d",10+10*10+10);

You could use a const variable for more reliable behaviour:

const int d = 10+10;
share|improve this answer
add comment

The macro is expanded as is. Your program becomes

/* declarations and definitions from headers */

int main()
{
    printf("%d",10+10*10+10);
return 0;
}

and the calculation is interpreted as

10 + (10 * 10) + 10

Always use parenthesis around macros (and their arguments when you have them)

#define d (10 + 10)
share|improve this answer
add comment
#define 

preprocessor directive substitute the first element with the second element.

Just like a "find and replace"

share|improve this answer
add comment

I'm not sure about #include but in C# #define is used at the top to define a symbol. This allows the coder to do things like

#define DEBUG

string connStr = "myProductionDatabase";

#if DEBUG
    connStr = "myTestDatabase"
#edif
share|improve this answer
add comment

10+10*10+10 = 20 + 100 = 120

Simple math ;)

Macro doesn't evaluate the value (it doesn't add 10 + 10) but simply replaces all it's occurences with the specified expression.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.