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We have a Transaction class that's very loaded; so loaded that I originally ended up passing almost 20 argument to the ctor. After extracting a few value objects, there are still 12 arguments left, which I still think is too much.

How would I go at avoiding this? I think it's reasonable the arguments are passed to the constructor since they're all required, and I want to make that explicit. I also like how if I add a property, I can add it to the ctor and let my compiler find the places it broke, instead of having to rely on tests for this per se. I don't think object initializers, or builders do the problem any good. It might become more obvious in the next coming days which arguments belong together, and could be composed though.

public class MyEntity() 
{
    public MyEntity(ValueType prop2, ValueType prop3, ...) 
    {
        Id = Guid.NewGuid();
        Prop2 = prop2;
        Prop3 = prop3;
        ...
    }

    public Guid Id { get; private set; }

    public ValueType Prop2 { get; private set; }

    public ValueType Prop3 { get; private set; }

    public ...
}
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4  
Can these parameters be grouped in any meaningful way? If not, what kind of purpose do they serve? –  Oded Jan 15 '13 at 20:04
    
If those arguments have all the same Type, just use MyEntity(params Type[] parameters) and then organize them in a different way, like through a List or a Dictionary... or pass a struct or a class as parameter in the ctor containing everything you need. Another alternative would be using constructor bubbling. –  Zarathos Jan 15 '13 at 20:06
    
@Zarathos - That goes against DDD, where domain meaning is what it's all about. –  Oded Jan 15 '13 at 20:06
    
Do you use every argument in every instance in which you call MyEntity? Are some sometimes null or irrelevant? –  Bobson Jan 15 '13 at 20:09
1  
Can you post the specifics of the constructor? We may be able to point out better ways to handle it with a more specific example. –  Bobson Jan 15 '13 at 22:13

4 Answers 4

Are you sure that all the parameters are required? The word "required" is deceptive, the compiler may force me to provide a string argument, for example, but it can't force me to provide a value that is not null or empty.

The only way to truly force valid data to be provided is to validate it at the point of use. Sometimes this has to be in the constructor, e.g. a class that wraps something that only has meaning when initialised, like an I/O object. However, it's usually sufficient to allow the calling code to set properties any old way, then validate their values in the method call that requires them.

I'm rambling a bit. My point is, don't get hung up on constructor parameters as the only way to provide initialisation data to a class. They give very little additional compiler protection beyond simple properties.

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It's a banking domain, so I would prefer never to have an object hanging around in an invalid state, if you know what I mean? –  JefClaes Jan 15 '13 at 20:20
    
I write banking apps as well. I think nothing of passing dumb DTOs all over the place, because the data is validated at the point of use. Your chosen architectural pattern(s) should direct your class design, not the low-level details of your validation strategy. –  Christian Hayter Jan 15 '13 at 21:01

When you output the full transaction details in a user or system interface, you will need all the parts. This is unlikely to help you find a split.

But, have a look at your internal processing - are there situations where you use only a subset of the fields on the transaction? Are there places where you pass in a Transaction, but only use 4 of the fields? If you literally always use all fields, then keep them in one object.

In the case of a banking transaction, I would consider a split along these lines:-

  • Where the money came from
  • Where the money went to
  • How the money was moved - which payment instrument or facility was used
  • Why the money was moved - reference numbers, etc
  • Amount and currency
  • Date
  • Status of the transaction

(Obviously this depends on your exact domain).

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How about encapsulating the parameters in a structure, and passing the structure in?

public struct ParamsStruct
{
    Type1 param1;
    Type2 param2;
    ...
}

public void Method(ParamsStruct p)
{
    ...
}

public void Main(String[] args)
{
    ParamsStruct p;
    p.param1 = ...
    p.param2 = ...
    Method(p);
}
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Doesn't this just move the problem? –  JefClaes Jan 15 '13 at 20:14
    
At the very least you could group the parameters logically into several structs, which should help with organization. –  Porkbutts Jan 15 '13 at 20:52
    
I agree to that last comment. I'm going to try to discover some more concepts. –  JefClaes Jan 15 '13 at 20:53
public class MyEntity() 
{
    public ValueType Prop1 { get; set; }

    public ValueType Prop2 { get; set; }

    // And so on...

    public MyEntity() 
    {
        Id = Guid.NewGuid();
    }
}

Then:

MyEntity entity = new MyEntity();
entity.Prop1 = prop1;
entity.Prop2 = prop2;
// And so on...

You can eventually consider two different design approaches:

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