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I have this code (which I expect to work but it fails).. I really have no idea why. Please help

     static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var x = new MyKeyedCollection();

        x.Add(new MyType() { Key = 400L, Value = 0.1 });
        x.Add(new MyType() { Key = 200L, Value = 0.1 });
        x.Add(new MyType() { Key = 100L, Value = 0.1 });
        x.Add(new MyType() { Key = 300L, Value = 0.1 });

        //foreach (var item in x)
        for (int i = 0; i < x.Count; i++)
        {
            //Debug.WriteLine(item.PriceLevel);
            Debug.WriteLine(x[i].Key);
        }
    }
}

public class MyType 
{
    public long Key;
    public double Value;
}

public class MyKeyedCollection : KeyedCollection<long, MyType>
{
    protected override long GetKeyForItem(MyType item)
    {
        return item.Key;
    }
}

Exception:

System.Collections.Generic.KeyNotFoundException was unhandled
Message=The given key was not present in the dictionary.
Source=mscorlib StackTrace: at System.ThrowHelper.ThrowKeyNotFoundException() at System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary2.get_Item(TKey key) at System.Collections.ObjectModel.KeyedCollection2.get_Item(TKey key) at KeyedCollectionTest.Program.Main(String[] args) in ...\Program.cs:line 25 at System.AppDomain._nExecuteAssembly(Assembly assembly, String[] args) at Microsoft.VisualStudio.HostingProcess.HostProc.RunUsersAssembly() at System.Threading.ExecutionContext.Run(ExecutionContext executionContext, ContextCallback callback, Object state) at System.Threading.ThreadHelper.ThreadStart() InnerException:

How come it tries to get Key instead of index? Key is clearly long and not int. I am sure I used KeyedCollection before and it worked just fine for long key and int index.

I tried to compile in ver 2, 3.5, 4, 4.5 (using VS2012)...

Dont get it.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

How come it tries to get Key instead of index? Key is clearly long and not int.

But int is convertible to long, so it's a valid candidate member.

The problem is that the this[TKey key] indexer is originally declared in KeyedCollection, whereas the this[int index] indexer is originally declared in Collection. The rules of overload resolution specify that the most derived class is searched first, and only the members which are first declared in that type are considered to start with. Only if that search fails does the compiler move up to the next level in the type hierarchy.

So if you write:

Collection<MyType> collection = x;
for (int i = 0; i < x.Count; i++)
{
    Debug.WriteLine(collection[i].Key);
}

it will work - because the compile-time type of collection is just Collection<T>, which only has the "int index" indexer.

Here's an example which shows the same behaviour without using generics, an indexer, or abstract classes:

using System;

class Base
{
    public void Foo(int x)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Base.Foo(int)");
    }
}

class Derived : Base
{
    public void Foo(long y)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Derived.Foo(long)");
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        Derived x = new Derived();
        Base y = x;
        x.Foo(5); // Derived.Foo(long)
        y.Foo(5); // Base.Foo(int)
    }
}

See my article on overloading for some more of the interesting rules involved.

share|improve this answer
    
if you have a WPF/SL dependency property of type long and you set its initial value to 0 you get exception (although int easily converts to long)... so.... this Key / index business is not obvious. why should it be converted robbing developers from using any integral type as a key. –  Boppity Bop Jan 15 '13 at 21:02
    
@Bobb: The WPF/SL part is almost certainly due to boxing - you can't unbox a boxed int value as a long, which is probably what's going on. As for why the conversion should be valid: because in many many cases it makes life simpler. This is a real corner case - and I've explained to you how to work around it. It's really not that hard, and you could even add an extension method for the sake of convenience if you want. –  Jon Skeet Jan 15 '13 at 21:05
    
I have. I am not happy with the extra operation. I believe .NET must provide a qualifier which would disable conversion for a parameter (eg in/out for co-contravariance support in 4.0) –  Boppity Bop Jan 15 '13 at 21:13
    
@Bobb: Well it simply doesn't. There's no "must" about it. Note that even if there weren't the implicit conversion here, you'd still have a problem if you used a KeyedCollection<int, MyType> –  Jon Skeet Jan 15 '13 at 22:33
    
yes I know. but int just one type to have restricted. long ulong uint shot ushort - quite another story. –  Boppity Bop Jan 16 '13 at 15:19
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var x = new MyKeyedCollection();

        x.Add(new MyType() { Key = 110L, Value = 0.1 });
        x.Add(new MyType() { Key = 122L, Value = 0.1 });
        x.Add(new MyType() { Key = 233L, Value = 0.1 });
        x.Add(new MyType() { Key = 344L, Value = 0.1 });

        foreach(int key in x.Keys())
        {   
            Console.WriteLine(x[key].Key);
        }

        Console.Read();
    }
}

public class MyType
{
    public long Key;
    public double Value;
}

public class MyKeyedCollection : KeyedCollection<long, MyType>
{
    protected override long GetKeyForItem(MyType item)
    {
        return item.Key;
    }

    public IEnumerable<long> Keys()
    {
        foreach (MyType item in this.Items)
        {
            yield return GetKeyForItem(item);
        }
    }
}

Wouldn't method for iterating over keys resolve problem here, or am I missing something?

share|improve this answer

You can also simply use:

Debug.WriteLine(x.ElementAt(i).Key);

"ElementAt" allows you to retrieve the element at the specified index. This works nicely if your keys are of type int.

share|improve this answer
    
@ jim @ szymon you both have missed the point. question was not how to access but why the indexer isn't working as I would expect it. Jon explained that my expectations aren't nobody's concern :) –  Boppity Bop Mar 28 '13 at 15:03

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