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I have a WPF window with a button that spawns a BackgroundWorker thread to create and send an email. While this BackgroundWorker is running, I want to display a user control that displays some message followed by an animated "...". That animation is run by a timer inside the user control.

Even though my mail sending code is on a BackgroundWorker, the timer in the user control never gets called (well, it does but only when the Backgroundworker is finished, which kinda defeats the purpose...).

Relevant code in the WPF window:

private void button_Send_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    busyLabel.Show(); // this should start the animation timer inside the user control

    BackgroundWorker worker = new BackgroundWorker();
    worker.RunWorkerCompleted += new RunWorkerCompletedEventHandler(worker_RunWorkerCompleted);
    worker.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(worker_DoWork);
    worker.RunWorkerAsync();      
}

void worker_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
{
    this.Dispatcher.Invoke((Action)(() =>
    {      
        string body = textBox_Details.Text;
        body += "User-added addtional information:" + textBox_AdditionalInfo.Text; 

        var smtp = new SmtpClient
        {
            ...
        };

        using (var message = new MailMessage(fromAddress, toAddress)
        {
            Subject = subject,
            Body = body
        })
        {
            smtp.Send(message);
        }
    }));

}

Relevant code in the user control ("BusyLabel"):

public void Show()
{
    tb_Message.Text = Message;
    mTimer = new System.Timers.Timer();
    mTimer.Interval = Interval;
    mTimer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(mTimer_Elapsed);
    mTimer.Start();
}

void mTimer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
    this.Dispatcher.Invoke((Action)(() =>
    { 

        int numPeriods = tb_Message.Text.Count(f => f == '.');
        if (numPeriods >= NumPeriods)
        {
            tb_Message.Text = Message;
        }
        else
        {
            tb_Message.Text += '.';
        }         
    }));
}

public void Hide()
{
    mTimer.Stop();
}

Any ideas why it's locking up?

share|improve this question
    
Do you have to invoke worker_DoWork on the UI thread as I dont see any UIElements called in there, perhaps removing the Dispatcher.Invoke in the worker_DoWork will solve the issue. Or change it to Dispatcher.BeginInvoke –  sa_ddam213 Jan 15 '13 at 21:22
    
Oops I axed some code that accesses the UI. It's re-added now. –  akevan Jan 15 '13 at 21:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Using Dispatcher.Invoke in your worker_DoWork method is putting execution back on the UI thread, so you are not really doing the work asynchronously.

You should be able to just remove that, based on the code you are showing.

If there are result values that you need to show after the work is complete, put it in the DoWorkEventArgs and you will be able to access it (on the UI thread) in the worker_RunWorkerCompleted handler's event args.

A primary reason for using BackgroundWorker is that the marshalling is handled under the covers, so you shouldn't have to use Dispatcher.Invoke.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry I forgot to include some UI-accessing code in the above. That's why it's using Dispatcher.Invoke. I've re-added it. –  akevan Jan 15 '13 at 21:27
    
But you pointed me to the problem - "Using Dispatcher.Invoke in your worker_DoWork method is putting execution back on the UI thread". I need to grab the UI elements on the UI thread, then pass them to the BG worker as arguments, remove that Dispatcher from the BG worker then all works great. Thanks!! –  akevan Jan 15 '13 at 21:34

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