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I'm trying to write a custom adapter to adapt a simple class into a ListView. The class is for SMS messages and it contains simple fields like body, sender address, etc. Below, see my adapter layout:

<RelativeLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools"
android:layout_width="match_parent"
android:layout_height="match_parent" >

    <ImageView
    android:id="@+id/imgContactPhoto"
    android:contentDescription="Contact photo"
    android:layout_width="90sp"
    android:layout_height="90sp" />

    <TextView
    android:id="@+id/lblMsg"
    android:layout_width="fill_parent"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:layout_toRightOf="@id/imgContactPhoto" 
    android:paddingLeft="10sp" />

</RelativeLayout>

And my custom adapter class:

public class SmsListAdapter extends ArrayAdapter{

  private int resource;
  private LayoutInflater inflater;
  private Context context;

  @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
  public SmsListAdapter(Context ctx, int resourceId, List objects) {
      super(ctx, resourceId, objects);
      resource = resourceId;
      inflater = LayoutInflater.from( ctx );
      context=ctx;
  }

  @Override
  public View getView (int position, View convertView, ViewGroup parent) {
        //create a new view of the layout and inflate it in the row
        convertView = ( RelativeLayout ) inflater.inflate( resource, null );

        // Extract the object to show 
        Sms msg = (Sms) getItem(position);

        // Take the TextView from layout and set the message
        TextView lblMsg = (TextView) convertView.findViewById(R.id.lblMsg);
        lblMsg.setText(msg.getBody());

        //Take the ImageView from layout and set the contact image
        long contactId = fetchContactId(msg.getSenderNum());
        String uriContactImg = getPhotoUri(contactId).toString();
        ImageView imgContactPhoto = (ImageView) convertView.findViewById(R.id.imgContactPhoto);
        int imageResource = context.getResources().getIdentifier(uriContactImg, null, context.getPackageName());
        Drawable image = context.getResources().getDrawable(imageResource);
        imgContactPhoto.setImageDrawable(image);
        return convertView;
  }
}

When I attempt to activate the adapter, I get an error on the first line of getView() saying that a TextView cannot be cast to a RelativeLayout.

What I'm not clear on is why that is a TextView in the first place. My list item layout is set as a RelativeLayout and that's what should be being inflated, unless I'm mistaken. Can anyone help me debug this?

share|improve this question
    
how do you initialize your SmsListAdapter? – deville Jan 15 '13 at 21:37
    
Specifically, what is the resourceId sent to it? – zyklonSport Jan 15 '13 at 21:38
1  
That doesn't make sense... Try cleaning your project. (I don't know why you are trying to convert it to a RelativeLayout since convertView is just a View, but that's not the problem.) – Sam Jan 15 '13 at 21:44
1  
If this doesn't help, try removing explicit cast to RelativeLayout, it is redundant in this case. – deville Jan 15 '13 at 21:50
3  
You should watch this Google Talk to learn about View recycling, ViewHolders and other tips to write an efficient Adapter. – Sam Jan 15 '13 at 21:58
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Removing the explicit cast of convertView to RelativeLayout should help.

share|improve this answer
    
Wrong, in fact I'd argue that it should be there for type safety if we know that we always want this view to be a RelativeLayout. Also view recycling as shown in Gabe Sechan's answer below. – zyklonSport Jan 15 '13 at 22:17
    
@zyklonSport First, findViewById() works perfectly just with simple View, it doesn't need to be a RelativeLayout, so type safety is not violated here. Second, it helped. Third, view recycling is indeed useful, but it has nothing to do with the question. – deville Jan 15 '13 at 22:21

Use a BaseAdapter to create your custom adapter. This is a bit harder to manage from the start, but makes your work easier later on.

public class GeneralAdapter extends BaseAdapter{

private LayoutInflater mInflater    = null;
private ArrayList<String> info      = null;

public GeneralAdapter( ArrayList<String> info ) {
    this.info = info;
}

@Override
public int getCount() {
    return info.size();
}

@Override
public Object getItem(int position) {
    return info.get(position);
}

@Override
public long getItemId(int position) {
    return position;
}

@Override
public View getView(int position, View convertView, ViewGroup parent) {
    ViewHolder holder;

    if (convertView == null) {
        convertView = mInflater.inflate(R.layout.YOURLAYOUT, null);

        holder                  = new ViewHolder();
        holder.generalTV        = (TextView) convertView.findViewById(R.id.lblMsg);
        holder.generalIV        = (ImageView) convertView.findViewById(R.id.imgContactPhoto);

        convertView.setTag(holder);
    } else {
        holder = (ViewHolder) convertView.getTag();
    }

    holder.generalTV.setText(info.getBody());
    holder.generalIV.setBackgroundResource(R.id.YOURIMAGE);

    return null;
}

private class ViewHolder {
    TextView generalTV;
    ImageView generalIV;
}

}
share|improve this answer

On this line:

       convertView = ( RelativeLayout ) inflater.inflate( resource, null );

instead of resource, try using the full id of the layout- R.layout.whatever

Also, you should only inflate the layout if the incoming view is null. Otherwise the view is already inflated and you should just overwrite all its values.

share|improve this answer
    
eventually, resource value is equal to R.layout.whatever – deville Jan 15 '13 at 21:45
    
I put the full id in but i'm getting the same result. Fairly certain it's being passed in correctly. – bkaiser Jan 15 '13 at 21:46
    
Sounds from the other comment thread that there was an eclipse screwup and cleaning the project worked. But you do need this null check, otherwise you're losing a lot of the efficiency a listview gives you. Without the null check you create a new row each time its called, with it you only create a new row on the first initialization and reassign them thereafter (inflating can be expensive). – Gabe Sechan Jan 15 '13 at 21:54

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