Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a simple way (hoping for a small function, not a library) to add or subtract from a 64bit integer in JavaScript?

Example 64bit int: 291270990346989568

Background: I am working with the Twitter API which has 64bit tweet ID's. I'd like to add or subtract one from those IDs to manipulate what results I get back from Twitter.

share|improve this question
3  
You mean like yournumber--; and yournumber++; ? –  Alex W Jan 15 '13 at 21:41
1  
Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/6041124 –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Jan 15 '13 at 21:42
    
You will have to split it into two 32-bit ints; in (current) JavaScript 291270990346989568 === 291270990346989600 you don't have that level of precision –  Paul S. Jan 15 '13 at 21:45
    
@PaulS. I was thinking something along those lines. Splitting, adding or subtracting, then re-joining... The number is stored as a string, so I don't need JS to recognize the end result as an INT either. But I really don't know how to do this. –  Justin Jan 15 '13 at 21:54
    
Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/9643626/… –  JohnJohnGa Jan 15 '13 at 21:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The following code does what you've described.

Splitting, adding or subtracting, then re-joining...

This code has both increment and decrement functions, and a test function with some edge cases. When splitting number strings and doing math on them, you need to consider what happens to "leading zeroes", so there's a padding function for that.

/*
 * Prepend zeros to expand a given string to given length
 *
 * @var {String} numStr Number
 * @var {Number} len    Length to pad out to
 *
 * @returns {String}
 */
function pad0 (numStr,len) {
  while (numStr.length < len) {
    numStr = "0" + numStr;
  }
  return numStr
}

/*
 * Decrement the given (64 bit) integer.
 *
 * @var {String} int64  Postive non-zero integer, as a string
 *
 * @returns {String}
 */
function decrInt64 (int64) {
  var result = "";
  var midpt = Math.floor(int64.length/2);
  var upper = int64.substring(0,midpt);
  var lower = int64.substring(midpt);
  var upperVal = new Number(upper);
  var lowerVal = new Number(lower);

  if (lowerVal == 0) {
    if (upperVal == 0) {
      // We don't support negative numbers
      result = "*ERROR*"
    }
    else {
      // borrow 1
      result = pad0((--upperVal).toString(),upper.length) +
               (new Number("1"+lower) - 1).toString();
    }
  }
  else {
    var newLower = (lowerVal - 1).toString();
    result = upper + pad0(newLower,lower.length);
  }
  alert(result);
}

/*
 * Increment the given (64 bit) integer.
 *
 * @var {String} int64  Postive, as a string
 *
 * @returns {String}
 */
function incrInt64 (int64) {
  var result = "";
  var midpt = Math.floor(int64.length/2);
  var upper = int64.substring(0,midpt);
  var lower = int64.substring(midpt);
  var upperVal = new Number(upper);
  var lowerVal = new Number(lower);

  var newLower = (++lowerVal).toString();
  // Did we overflow?
  if (lower.length < newLower.length) {
    // Yes, carry the 1
    result = (++upperVal).toString() + newLower.substring(1);
  }
  else {
    result = upper + pad0(newLower,lower.length);
  }
  alert(result);
}

// Test function
window.displaymessage= function ()
{
  decrInt64("291270990046989568");
  incrInt64("291270990046989568");
  decrInt64("000000000000000000");
  incrInt64("000000000000000000");
  decrInt64("000000001000000000");
  incrInt64("000000001000000000");
  decrInt64("099999999999999999");
  incrInt64("099999999999999999");
  decrInt64("999999999999999999");
  incrInt64("999999999999999999");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, works as expected. jsfiddle.net/bwmNU/2 –  Justin Jan 16 '13 at 0:06
    
That jsfiddle link takes me to a crippled page, is there something wrong with it? –  Mogsdad Jan 16 '13 at 0:43
    
Just tried it again and it works fine for me. I'm using Chrome browser for OSX. It's just your code with my simple test case. –  Justin Jan 16 '13 at 21:57
    
Chrome was the key - didn't work in IE9. Cool! I'd actually done the coding in Google Apps-Script, so I could single-step in the debugger. –  Mogsdad Jan 17 '13 at 21:05

Addition of integer-formatted strings (base 10) of indefinite lengths can be done by splitting the string into segments of 9 characters, calculating + or - for that and then moving to the preceding 9 characters. This is because the largest 9 character number, 999999999 is 32-bit safe (as is 1999999999, which I used in subtraction).

The following code has 3 functions and the word integer is assumed to mean an integer-formatted string.

  • addAsString, takes two non-negative integers x and y, returns x + y
  • subtractAsString, takes two non-negative integers x and y, |x| >= |y|, returns x - y
  • addORsub, takes any two integers x and y, returning x + y

I've tried to explain what is happening via comments in the code

// Indefinate length addition
function addAsString(x, y) { // x, y strings
    var s = '';
    if (y.length > x.length) { // always have x longer
        s = x;
        x = y;
        y = s;
    }
    s = (parseInt(x.slice(-9),10) + parseInt(y.slice(-9),10)).toString(); // add last 9 digits
    x = x.slice(0,-9); // cut off last 9 digits
    y = y.slice(0,-9);
    if (s.length > 9) { // if >= 10, add in the 1
        if (x === '') return s; // special case (e.g. 9+9=18)
        x = addAsString(x, '1');
        s = s.slice(1);
    } else if (x.length) { // if more recursions to go
        while (s.length < 9) { // make sure to pad with 0s
            s = '0' + s;
        }
    }
    if (y === '') return x + s; // if no more chars then done, return
    return addAsString(x, y) + s; // else recurse, next digit
}

// Indefinate length subtraction (x - y, |x| >= |y|)
function subtractAsString(x, y) {
    var s;
    s = (parseInt('1'+x.slice(-9),10) - parseInt(y.slice(-9),10)).toString(); // subtract last 9 digits
    x = x.slice(0,-9); // cut off last 9 digits
    y = y.slice(0,-9);
    if (s.length === 10 || x === '') { // didn't need to go mod 1000000000
        s = s.slice(1);
    } else { // went mod 1000000000, inc y
        if (y.length) { // only add if makes sense
            y = addAsString(y, '1');
        } else { // else set
            y = '1';
        }
        if (x.length) {
            while (s.length < 9) { // pad s
                s = '0' + s;
            }
        }
    }
    if (y === '') { // finished
        s = (x + s).replace(/^0+/,''); // dont return all 0s
        return s;
    }
    return subtractAsString(x, y) + s;
}

// Indefinate length addition or subtraction (via above)
function addORsub(x, y) {
    var s = '';
    x = x.replace(/^(-)?0+/,'$1').replace(/^-?$/,'0'); // -000001 = -1
    y = y.replace(/^(-)?0+/,'$1').replace(/^-?$/,'0'); // -000000 =  0
    if (x[0] === '-') { // x negative
        if (y[0] === '-') { // if y negative too
            return '-' + addAsString(x.slice(1), y.slice(1)); // return -(|x|+|y|)
        }
        return addORsub(y, x); // else swap
    }
    if (y[0] === '-') { // x positive, y negative
        s = y.slice(1);
        if (s.length < x.length || (s.length === x.length && s < x)) return subtractAsString(x, s) || '0'; // if |x|>|y|, return x-y
        if (s === x) return '0'; // equal then 0
        s = subtractAsString(s, x); // else |x|<|y|
        s = (s && '-' + s) || '0';
        return s; // return -(|y|-x)
    }
    return addAsString(x, y); // x, y positive, return x+y
}

Example usage (fiddle)

var i = addORsub('291270990346989568', '1'); // add
i === '291270990346989569';

i = addORsub('291270990346989568', '-1'); // subtract
i === '291270990346989567';
share|improve this answer
    
i would switch your cast (+) with parseInt(x,10) –  JohnJohnGa Jan 15 '13 at 22:17
    
@JohnJohnGa Yep. I could also do this in groups of 9 digits at a time.. let me edit –  Paul S. Jan 15 '13 at 22:22
    
So how would I call this? Just split the INT and pass it in? Perhaps you could setup a working example in jsfiddle.net –  Justin Jan 15 '13 at 22:38
    
@Justin edited in example use and to pad s if it is short (rare cases e.g. 1000000000+1 would have become 11, now fixed) –  Paul S. Jan 15 '13 at 22:56
1  
@Justin Added more code for it. I know it looks messy and could probably be cleaned up, but these functions now support addition and subtraction for an integer of any length, with addORsub accepting positive OR negative numbers (try my fiddle with any ints, overkill galore). –  Paul S. Jan 16 '13 at 1:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.