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This is what I am trying to accomplish:

|---------| |----------|
| TableC1 | | TableC2  |
|---------| |----------|
     |------------|
     | TableC3    |
     |------------|

THis above which you can see is what I am trying to accomplish. TableCell1 and TableCell2 nicely align in the center of the table, but since I want to have only a single table-cell underneath them, the TableCell3 just goes to one of the sides, left or right doesn't matter.

This is a snippet of how I've written it:

HTML:

<table id = "some-boxes">

<tr>
<td id = "first-box">
SOME TEXT101
</td>

<td id = "second-box">
SOME TEXT202
</td>
</tr>

<td id = "third-box">
SOME TEXT303
</td>
</table

CSS:

#first-box{
   width: 100px;
}
#second-box{
   width: 100px;
}
#third-box{
   width: 200px;
   text-align: center;
   margin-left: 50%;
   margin-left: 50%;
}

Hope someone has an answer to this mystery of mine. Thanks in regards :)

share|improve this question
    
Is there a reason you wish to use a table and not just use divs? Div example: jsfiddle.net/A7hAX –  DMoses Jan 15 '13 at 21:56
    
Not only is the markup not well formed (missing tr for the last cell), but this doesn't look like tabular data. –  cimmanon Jan 15 '13 at 22:01
    
I missed the tr on purpose on the last one, because it made the table-cell move to one site - I believed. Therefore I removed it in hope of making it more movable. –  JohnSmith Jan 15 '13 at 22:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use colspan to specify how many columns you want the <td> tag to take up.

<td id = "third-box" colspan="2">
SOME TEXT303
</td>

Here is a visual example. I just enabled borders to demonstrate: http://codepen.io/AlienHoboken/pen/uFlIC

Also, you can get rid of the margin rules.

share|improve this answer
    
colspan="2". 2 how much 2px 2cm 2mm... columns? What. Anyway I will change to divs again and things will I guess become a little easier if this doesn't work. Thank you! –  JohnSmith Jan 15 '13 at 22:14
    
@johnsmith colspan="2", "col" is the unit of measurement. As in the table cell will span two columns. Aside from emails and tabular data you really shouldn't use tables because you end up having to follow annoying nesting rules like this. –  Swordfish0321 Jan 15 '13 at 22:21
    
@JohnSmith Colspan is measured in columns. Each <td> in a <tr> takes up one column. So when you say colspan="2" you are saying, I want you to take up TWO columns instead of one. –  AlienHoboken Jan 15 '13 at 22:58

Table cells do not obey margin or object alignment rules. They have defined positions in a table. The first cell in row 2 will always start below the first cell in row 1. You can make the cell span two columns using colspan=2, but it cannot partially overlap another cell unless you play math games with column spanning. You are better off using CSS positioning on div items.

share|improve this answer
    
Okey, then I'll just switch to using divs. You seen I was convinced that using table cells would be easier, than using divs. Well I guess I'll just change then. Gracias! =) –  JohnSmith Jan 15 '13 at 22:13

If you're in a position where the markup cannot be modified, this will work:

http://jsfiddle.net/Aam6T/

table#some-boxes, table#some-boxes tr {
  display: block;
  text-align: center;
}

table#some-boxes td {
  display: inline-block;
  border: 1px solid;
}

However, the cells in the preceding rows won't line up anymore.

share|improve this answer

First of all, you should correct your table by wrapping a <tr></tr> tag around <td id="third-box">...</td>. Then you should use the colspan atrribute within #third-box.

<table id="some-boxes">
    <tr>
        <td id="first-box">
            SOME TEXT101
        </td>
        <td id="second-box">
            SOME TEXT202
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td id="third-box" colspan="2">
            SOME TEXT303
        </td>
    </tr>
</table>

This above will give you a full-table-width third cell on the second row. But if you want to produce the exact table in your 'drawing' (the third cell with the same size and centered on the second row):

<table id="some-boxes">
    <tr>
        <td id="first-box">
            SOME TEXT101
        </td>
        <td id="second-box">
            SOME TEXT202
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td id="third-box" colspan="2">
            <div id="third-box-inner">
                SOME TEXT303
            </div>
        </td>
    </tr>
</table>

With an additional CSS decleration:

div#third-box-inner
{
    width: 100px;
    text-align: center;
    margin-left: 50px;
}

One more suggestion: I wouldn't use spaces before and after the equal sign when setting HTML attributes.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help. I think I've got enough tips to last for a while and I guess also 3 or 4 actual solutions. Though why shouldn't I use spaces after and before the equal sign? Is that bad? It's just a "trying to be coder neat" practice I have. –  JohnSmith Jan 15 '13 at 22:19
    
It's not wrong to use spaces and browsers will handle them. But whitespace will add extra bytes to your document and since too many attributes are used in an HTML document, I would really consider this to avoid unnecessary bandwidth usage. –  Onur Yıldırım Jan 15 '13 at 22:25

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