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Found myself in situation, where I need to decompress CSS through Middleware..(IE *cough *cough)

I've Googled, RubyGem'd, Github'd and haven't found anything

It seems solutions are a one way ticket. They compress (minify) but dont uncompress (unminify)

I hope I'm wrong, is there anything out there that can do this??

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Just don't compress it in the first place? –  meagar Jan 15 '13 at 22:12
    
Maybe as a last resort. If there is a better way, I'd prefer that. –  GN. Jan 15 '13 at 22:16
    
It would probably be easier and less intensive to detect user agent and link an uncompressed CSS file for IE users. –  Michael Papile Jan 15 '13 at 22:19
    
I'd cache the unminified version. But I agree. My first plan was to do just that, detect user agents and link them to uncompressed CSS. Haven't found a way for Rails/Sprockets to precompile both a unminified/minified version during Heroku deployment. Im still exploring that option as well. In the meantime, this bindle.me/blog/index.php/200/… gave me the idea. –  GN. Jan 15 '13 at 22:27
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You can hijack the assets:precompile:all rake task to customize the logic, or compile your assets locally, check them in to a special git branch just for heroku and deploy from there. –  Daniel Evans Jan 15 '13 at 22:54

2 Answers 2

Its highly unlikely that you really want to be decompressing assets on every IE request. Imagine firing up a JS runtime for every request just to compile less. Instead, consider storing a second copy of the assets that are uncompressed and can be served statically.

You may want to determine what about compiling your assets causes a problem with IE. It may be a bug in the compression software or you may need to change settings or to a different minifier. Or better yet, it could be an indication that you have a syntax error in your CSS that other browsers are forgiving you for when compressed, and IE is not.

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Thanks for the response. Css is compiling from Sass, which catches most errors. I also ran it though [CSSLint](csslint.net) for sanity check. As for the compressor causing the issue, I had the similar thoughts. I swapped Sprocket's SASS compressor out with YUI and same thing happened. I dont want to decompress on every request. I'm totally not in love with the solution. I'm open to suggestions. Although it would only decompress on first request, future resources would be served from Rack Cache. –  GN. Jan 16 '13 at 2:48

It might be worth explaining the specific issue you are having with IE and then talk about solving that problem.

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CSS styles broke in (only) IE8 after deploying to Heroku. I had a hunch it was compression breaking IE, so I precompiled locally. CSS styles broke. I copied / pasted the compressed CSS into an online decompressor. It again worked. –  GN. Jan 16 '13 at 2:33

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