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I've got a situation where I need to read in multiple xml files and build a single model from it. Sadly, the files are generated by a legacy system that I absolutely cannot alter.

One of the XML files that's giving me trouble looks more or less like this (altered to remove proprietary data):

<resource lang="en" dataId="900">
 numbered content here, 900-919 ...

    <string name="920-name">Document Shredder</string>
    <string name="920-desc">A machine ideal for destroying documents that deserve it. It can cross-shred anything from tissue paper to small netbooks with minimal noise. Remember, hackers can't access the documents if you've shredded the drives.</string>
    <string name="920-cat">office,appliance</string>
    <string name="921-name">Plastic Ladle</string>
    <string name="921-desc">This is a big plastic ladle, ideal for soups and sauces.</string>
    <string name="921-cat">kitchen,utensils</string>

... similar numbered content here, 922-934 ...

    <string name="935-name">Green Laser Pointer</string>
    <string name="935-desc">A High-Powered green laser pointer, ideal for irritating cats.</string>
    <string name="935-cat">office,tool</string>
    <string name="936-name">Black Metal Filing Cabinet</string>
    <string name="936-desc">A large, metal cabinet (black) built to store hanging file folders.</string>
    <string name="936-cat">office,storage</string>

... similar numbered content here, 937-994
</resource>

which I parse into a List<CString>, where CString.java is:

public class CString {
    public String name;
    public String desc;

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "CString {!name: " + name + " !body: " + body + "}\n";
    }
}

I've tried using a DocumentBuilder, and, when that didn't work right, just a plain SaxParser. No matter how I go about it, though, when I go back through my CStrings, I have a few where the body actually contains unparsed tags of different parts of the document. For example, printing out my aforementioned List<CString> might yield something like:

[ CStrings for 900-919 ...

, CString {!name: 920-name !body: Document Shredder}
, CString {!name: 920-desc !body: irritating cats.</string>
    <string name="935-cat">office,tool</string>
    <string name="936-name">Black Metal Filing Cabinet</e. Remember, hackers can't access the documents if you've shredded the drives.}
, CString {!name: 920-cat !body: office,appliance}
, CString {!name: 921-name !body: Plastic Ladle}
, CString {!name: 921-desc !body: This is a big plastic ladle, ideal for soups and sauces.}
, CString {!name: 921-cat !body: kitchen,utensils}

... CStrings for 922-934 ... 

, CString {!name: 935-name !body: Green Laser Pointer}
, CString {!name: 935-desc !body: A High-Powered green laser pointer, ideal for irritating cats.}
, CString {!name: 935-cat !body: office,tool}
, CString {!name: 936-name !body: Black Metal Filing Cabinet}
, CString {!name: 936-desc !body: A large, metal cabinet (black) built to store hanging file folders.}
, CString {!name: 936-cat !body: office,storage}

... CStrings for 937-994
]

In the SaxParser version of my code, I had the following characters method in my DefaultHandler:

public void characters(char ch[], int start, int length) throws SAXException {
    String value = new String(ch, start, length).trim();
    switch(currentQName.toString()) { // currentQName is a StringBuilder that holds just the current xml element's name
        case "string":
            if (value.contains("</string")) {
                System.err.println("!!! Parse Error !!! " + value);
            }
}

which, as you might have guessed, yields:

!!! Parse Error !!! irritating cats.</string>
        <string name="935-cat">office,tool</string>
        <string name="936-name">Black Metal Filing Cabinet</e. Remember, hackers can't access the documents if you've shredded the drives.

I wouldn't normally ask a question this esoteric, especially when I can't provide the concrete data and code, but no amount of Googling seems to yield anything that I've been able to nail down, and of course the code is not throwing (or suppressing) any exceptions.

The one thing I have noticed is that when there's wrong data, as seen in the above CString for 920-desc, the wrong data in this case was 138 characters long and, not coincidentally, the good data picks up exactly 139 characters into what it should be. Which makes me think it's some kind of buffer problem. However, whether I let DocumentBuilder manage the buffers, or I try to manage them more manually with a straight SaxParser, I still get the exact same wrong text in the same places every single time. Finally, I don't ever notice any wrong text when dealing with the shorter strings, name and cat, which I think points to char buffer issues, too.

Any ideas would be helpful!

share|improve this question
    
it's very strange. The only thing I could think of, is if the xml is missing some double quote " or some tag closing parenthesis or contains some unquoted special chars, like angle parenthesis and chars like&. Your handler looks correct to me. Or, maybe the buffer gets modified while it's parsed. Check also the Parse error you posted there is something strange there: ` Filing Cabinet</e. Remember, ` –  Luigi R. Viggiano Jan 15 '13 at 22:42
    
The problem is going to be in the source file. DocumentBuilder gets daily use by hundreds of thousands of people, so the likelihood of such an obvious bug is infinitesimal. My best recommendation is that you look at the source file in a hex editor, to see what the actual contents are. –  parsifal Jan 15 '13 at 22:43
    
Also: you aren't retrieving these files from a server, are you? If yes, look at the code that retrieves the file. –  parsifal Jan 15 '13 at 22:45
    
@parsifal The files are downloaded from a server to a directory, and then parsed from the local system. After reading in the files, I also did a check where I wrote them back out, and they appear to be in tact as far as I can tell. As far as looking through the hex contents of the originals, what kinds of things would you be looking for? –  Patrick Jan 15 '13 at 22:46
1  
A hex editor will show you general "characters that don't belong," such as those from the wrong encoding or outside the allowable range for XML. Although, to be honest, those should cause the parser to throw an exception. It also lets you look at the text without being misled by what you think is correct markup. –  parsifal Jan 15 '13 at 22:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Almost certainly, you don't have well-formed XML (your comments about absolutely not being allowed to change the source system are a bad omen, but you're hardly alone in that predicament.)

Have a look at this question How to parse badly formed XML in Java?

If I were you, I'd use raw string manipulation and/or regular expressions to either extract the data directly or fix it up to be well formed XML. JAXB is much nicer for handling XML in Java by the way (but still needs it to be well formed)

share|improve this answer
    
That's totally believable, and I don't trust the source system as far as I can throw it. If the xml passes a validator, like validator.w3.org/check, what other indications are there that it's poorly formed? –  Patrick Jan 15 '13 at 23:05
    
Hmm, if it passes the w3c I'd change my mind and say it probably is well formed... Unless by coincidence the bad formatting happens to make a well formed doc. Otherwise, maybe a character encoding issue? –  artbristol Jan 15 '13 at 23:14
    
I took the file from the question and removed everything after the tag with 935-desc (keeping it well formed, just removing 935-cat and beyond, and leaving the closing </resource> tag, too). The problem goes away if I keep the file under almost exactly 16 KB, but every character I add after that starts to recreate the issue one character at a time. I'm sure this is really hard to follow, sorry about that. –  Patrick Jan 16 '13 at 0:15

I found a place in the code where special characters were being unnecessarily cleaned (I guess to combat previous issues with poor formatting from the source).

Here's the method that did all the stripping before:

private static InputSource getCleanSource(File file) {
    InputSource source = null;
    try {
        InputStream stream = new FileInputStream(file);
        String fileText = readFile(stream); // Gets file content as text from InputStream

        CharsetDecoder utf8Decoder = Charset.forName("UTF-8").newDecoder();
        utf8Decoder.onMalformedInput(CodingErrorAction.IGNORE);
        utf8Decoder.onUnmappableCharacter(CodingErrorAction.IGNORE);
        CharBuffer parsed = utf8Decoder.decode(ByteBuffer.wrap(readFile(stream).getBytes()));

        fileText = "<?xml version=\"1.1\" encoding=\"UTF-8\" ?>\n" + // put a good header
                parsed
                .replaceAll("<\\?.*?\\?>", "") // remove bad <?xml> tags
                .replaceAll("--+","--") // can't have <!--- text --->
                .replaceFirst("(?s)^.+?<\\?", "<?") // remove bad stuff before <?xml> tag
                .replaceAll("[^\\x20-\\x7e\\x0A]", "") // remove bad characters
                .replaceAll("[\\x0A]", " ") // remove line breaks
                ;
        Reader reader = new StringReader(fileText);
        source = new InputSource(reader);
    } catch (Throwable t) {
        System.err.println("Unknown trouble parsing: " + file.getName());
        t.printStackTrace();
    }

    return source;
}

After reviewing and tweaking this, everything works just fine if I change this method to:

private static InputSource getCleanSource(File file) {
    InputSource source = null;
    try {
        InputStream stream = new FileInputStream(file);
        String fileText = readFile(stream) // Gets file content as text from InputStream
                .replaceAll("--+","--") // can't have <!--- text --->
                .replaceFirst("(?s)^.+?<\\?", "<?") // remove bad stuff before <?xml> tag
                ;
        Reader reader = new StringReader(fileText);
        source = new InputSource(reader);
    } catch (Throwable t) {
        System.err.println("Unknown trouble parsing: " + file.getName());
        t.printStackTrace();
    }

    return source;
}

I haven't had time yet to go back and try to figure out what mystery characters or tags were being eaten up by the cleaning process. I have to assume that the source system originally delivered much less valid xml than it does now that merited such aggressive cleaning, but I don't think I'll ever know for sure.

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