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I am using Angular with Bootstrap. Here is the code for reference:

<form name="newUserForm" ng-submit="add()" class="" novalidate>
    <input type="text" class="input" ng-model="newUser.uname" placeholder="Twitter" ng-pattern="/^@[A-Za-z0-9_]{1,15}$/" required></td>
    <button type="submit" ng-disabled="newUserForm.$invalid" class="btn btn-add btn-primary">Add</button>
</form>

Bootstrap has styles for invalid fields in the form of input:invalid {.... }; these kick in when the field is empty. Now I also have some pattern matching via Angular. This creates odd cases when ":invalid" is off, but ".ng-invalid" is on, which would require me to re-implement bootstrap CSS classes for the ".ng-invalid" class.

I see two options, but having trouble with both

  • Make Angular use some custom classname instead of "ng-valid" (I don't know how to do this).
  • Disable html5 validation (I thought that that's what "novalidate" attribute in the form tag should do, but it does not).

The Angular-Bootstrap directives out there don't cover styling.

share|improve this question
2  
novalidate should "disable browser's native form validation" -- form docs –  Mark Rajcok Jan 15 '13 at 23:03

8 Answers 8

up vote 57 down vote accepted

Use Bootstrap's "error" class for styling. You can write less code.

<form name="myForm">
  <div class="control-group" ng-class="{error: myForm.name.$invalid}">
    <label>Name</label>
    <input type="text" name="name" ng-model="project.name" required>
    <span ng-show="myForm.name.$error.required" class="help-inline">
        Required</span>
  </div>
</form>
share|improve this answer
31  
Or if you are using bootstrap 3 ng-class="{'has-error': myForm.name.$invalid}" –  bibstha Nov 10 '13 at 12:32
6  
You can also add && myForm.name.$dirty to make the validation style only show after the user has interacted with the form control. –  mWillis Feb 28 at 18:09

The classes have changed in Bootstrap 3:

<form class="form-horizontal" name="form" novalidate ng-submit="submit()" action="/login" method="post">
  <div class="row" ng-class="{'has-error': form.email.$invalid, 'has-success': !form.email.$invalid}">
    <label for="email" class="control-label">email:</label>
    <div class="col">
    <input type="email" id="email" placeholder="email" name="email" ng-model="email" required>
    <p class="help-block error" ng-show="form.email.$dirty && form.email.$error.required">please enter your email</p>
    <p class="help-block error" ng-show="form.email.$error.email">please enter a valid email</p>
  ...

Note the quotes around 'has-error' and 'has-success': took a while to find that...

share|improve this answer
    
Has anyone gotten ng-class="(form.email.$invalid ? 'has-error' : 'has-success')" to work? –  kristianlm Aug 8 '13 at 22:00
4  
To avoid the inputs appearing invalid right after page-load I think you should check the $dirty property indicating whether the field was already edited: {'has-error': form.email.$dirty && form.email.$invalid, 'has-success': form.email.$dirty && !form.email.$invalid} But now this expression becomes so long that it gets prone to typing errors and hard to read and it is always similar so there should be a better way, not? –  mono68 Sep 23 '13 at 22:36
1  
I use a directive that adds a "submitted" flag to the form for that See: stackoverflow.com/questions/14965968/… –  malix Oct 16 '13 at 17:49
1  
@kristianlm did you tryng-class=" {'has-error': form.email.$invalid, 'has-success': !form.email.$invalid}" on a div ABOVE the input... –  malix Oct 16 '13 at 17:53
    
@malix that might work, but I was looking to not have to repeat form.email.$invalid. –  kristianlm Nov 5 '13 at 17:18

Another solution: Create directive which toggles has-error class according to a child input.

app.directive('bsHasError', [function() {
  return {
      restrict: "A",
      link: function(scope, element, attrs, ctrl) {
          var input = element.find('input[ng-model]');
          if (input) {
              scope.$watch(function() {
                  return input.hasClass('ng-invalid');
              }, function(isInvalid) {
                  element.toggleClass('has-error', isInvalid);
              });
          }
      }
  };
}]);

and then simple use it in template

<div class="form-group" bs-has-error>
    <input class="form-control" ng-model="foo" ng-pattern="/.../"/>
</div>
share|improve this answer
1  
I think a directive is the best solution in this case. –  JKillian Feb 28 at 21:57

Minor improvement to @farincz's answer. I agree that a directive is the best approach here but I didn't want to have to repeat it on every .form-group element so I updated the code to allow adding it to either the .form-group or to the parent <form> element (which will add it to all contained .form-group elements):

angular.module('directives', [])
  .directive('showValidation', [function() {
    return {
        restrict: "A",
        link: function(scope, element, attrs, ctrl) {

            if (element.get(0).nodeName.toLowerCase() === 'form') {
                element.find('.form-group').each(function(i, formGroup) {
                    showValidation(angular.element(formGroup));
                });
            } else {
                showValidation(element);
            }

            function showValidation(formGroupEl) {
                var input = formGroupEl.find('input[ng-model],textarea[ng-model]');
                if (input.length > 0) {
                    scope.$watch(function() {
                        return input.hasClass('ng-invalid');
                    }, function(isInvalid) {
                        formGroupEl.toggleClass('has-error', isInvalid);
                    });
                }
            }
        }
    };
}]);
share|improve this answer

If styling is the issue, but you don't want to disable the native validation, why not override the styling with your own, more specific style?

input.ng-invalid, input.ng-invalid:invalid {
   background: red;
   /*override any styling giving you fits here*/
}

Cascade your problems away with CSS selector specificity!

share|improve this answer

Thank you to @farincz for a great answer. Here are some modifications I have made to fit with my use case.

This version provides three directives:

  • bs-has-success
  • bs-has-error
  • bs-has (a convenience for when you want to use the other two together)

Modifications I have made:

  • Added a check to only show the has states when the form field is dirty, i.e. they won't be shown until somebody interacts with them.
  • Altered the string passed into element.find() for those not using jQuery, as element.find() in Angular's jQLite only supports finding elements by tagname.
  • Added support for select boxes and textareas.
  • Wrapped the element.find() in a $timeout to support cases where the element may not yet have it's children rendered to the DOM (e.g. if a child of the element is marked with ng-if).
  • Changed if expression to check for the length of the returned array (if(input) from @farincz's answer always returns true, as the return from element.find() is a jQuery array).

I hope somebody finds this useful!

angular.module('bs-has', [])
  .factory('bsProcessValidator', function($timeout) {
    return function(scope, element, ngClass, bsClass) {
      $timeout(function() {
        var input = element.find('input');
        if(!input.length) { input = element.find('select'); }
        if(!input.length) { input = element.find('textarea'); }
        if (input.length) {
            scope.$watch(function() {
                return input.hasClass(ngClass) && input.hasClass('ng-dirty');
            }, function(isValid) {
                element.toggleClass(bsClass, isValid);
            });
        }
      });
    };
  })
  .directive('bsHasSuccess', function(bsProcessValidator) {
    return {
      restrict: 'A',
      link: function(scope, element) {
        bsProcessValidator(scope, element, 'ng-valid', 'has-success');
      }
    };
  })
  .directive('bsHasError', function(bsProcessValidator) {
    return {
      restrict: 'A',
      link: function(scope, element) {
        bsProcessValidator(scope, element, 'ng-invalid', 'has-error');
      }
    };
  })
  .directive('bsHas', function(bsProcessValidator) {
    return {
      restrict: 'A',
      link: function(scope, element) {
        bsProcessValidator(scope, element, 'ng-valid', 'has-success');
        bsProcessValidator(scope, element, 'ng-invalid', 'has-error');
      }
    };
  });

Usage:

<!-- Will show success and error states when form field is dirty -->
<div class="form-control" bs-has>
  <label for="text"></label>
  <input 
   type="text" 
   id="text" 
   name="text" 
   ng-model="data.text" 
   required>
</div>

<!-- Will show success state when select box is anything but the first (placeholder) option -->
<div class="form-control" bs-has-success>
  <label for="select"></label>
  <select 
   id="select" 
   name="select" 
   ng-model="data.select" 
   ng-options="option.name for option in data.selectOptions"
   required>
    <option value="">-- Make a Choice --</option>
  </select>
</div>

<!-- Will show error state when textarea is dirty and empty -->
<div class="form-control" bs-has-error>
  <label for="textarea"></label>
  <textarea 
   id="textarea" 
   name="textarea" 
   ng-model="data.textarea" 
   required></textarea>
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
I've published it on bower as "angular-bootstrap-validation" with the credits to you and @farincz, hope you don't mind –  Guilherme Cardoso Jun 16 at 11:49
    
That's cool. I notice you've added in a feature where you can put the directive at the form level and have it recurse through the nested .form-group elements. That's nice but it won't work unless you include jQuery, as the built-in angular jqlite implementation of find only supports finding by tagname, not by selector. You might want to add a note in the README to that effect. –  fiznool Jun 25 at 15:19

Minor improvement to @Andrew Smith's answer. I change input elements, and using 'require' keyword.

.directive('showValidation', [function() {
    return {
        restrict: "A",
        require:'form',
        link: function(scope, element, attrs, formCtrl) {
            element.find('.form-group').each(function() {
                var $formGroup=$(this);
                var $inputs = $formGroup.find('input[ng-model],textarea[ng-model],select[ng-model]');

                if ($inputs.length > 0) {
                    $inputs.each(function() {
                        var $input=$(this);
                        scope.$watch(function() {
                            return $input.hasClass('ng-invalid');
                        }, function(isInvalid) {
                            $formGroup.toggleClass('has-error', isInvalid);
                        });
                    });
                }
            });
        }
    };
}]);
share|improve this answer

It's hard to tell for sure without a fiddle but looking at the angular.js code it does not replace classes - it just adds and removes its own. So any bootstrap classes (added dynamically by bootstrap UI scripts) should be untouched by angular.

That said, it does not make sense to use Bootstrap's JS functionality for validation at the same time as Angular - only use Angular. I would suggest you employ the bootstrap styles and the angular JS i.e. add the bootstrap css classes to your elements using a custom validation directive.

share|improve this answer
    
You are right, disabling native validation is the way to go. Yet I haven't been able to do that. I'll keep looking. Thanks! –  Ivan P Jan 17 '13 at 20:27

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