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I have a dictionary file containing lines
ns*.abc.com
ns*.xyz.com
I want to match patterns such as ns15.abc.com, nsABC.abc.com with the dictionary file and return true. E.g. ns15.abc.com is match while ns16.ABC.abc.com is not a match. Thanks in advance

public class ValidateDemo {  
    public static void main(String[] args) {  
    List<String> input = new ArrayList<String>();  

    input.add("ns14.abc.com");
    for (String str : input) {
        if (str.matches("ns*.abc.com")) {
            System.out.println("Match: " + str);
        }
    }
}
}
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2  
Can you show us what you have already tried? It will help us know what you are trying to do. –  Kendall Frey Jan 15 '13 at 23:36
    
public class ValidateDemo { public static void main(String[] args) { List<String> input = new ArrayList<String>(); input.add("ns14.abc.com"); for (String str : input) { if (str.matches("ns*.abc.com")) { System.out.println("Match: " + str); } } } } –  Suranga Jan 15 '13 at 23:41
    
Please don't post it in a comment. Edit it into your question. –  Kendall Frey Jan 15 '13 at 23:41
1  
Sorry, It was accidental. I have updated the post. –  Suranga Jan 15 '13 at 23:44
    
Your string doesn't use regex syntax. You can find out how to write a regex at regular-expressions.info/tutorial.html –  Kendall Frey Jan 15 '13 at 23:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In each entry from the dictionary, replace asterisk by "[^\.]*" and dot by "\." - there's your pattern for each individual entry:

    Pattern p = Pattern.compile("^" + dictEntry.replaceAll(".", "\\.").replaceAll("*", "[^\\.]*") + "$");

Or you can also join all dictionary entries with "|" to have single pattern matching them all.

share|improve this answer
    
Got it working. Many thanks. –  Suranga Jan 15 '13 at 23:52
    
Note: if you use Java 6, instead of escaping the dots, you can surround your literal text with \Q...\E. –  fge Jan 16 '13 at 0:10
1  
@fge or more generally, use Pattern.quote, which is designed for precisely this task, to turn a string into a regex that would match that string literally. –  Ian Roberts Jan 16 '13 at 0:42

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