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I wrote a more complex program but I have narrowed down my problem to the following one: Why is this program printing down junk and not hzllo? I have followed the values and memory address of temp and p with the debugger and it returns from the foo function correctly and for a reason I don't understand prints junk.

void foo(char **str) {
    char temp[79];
    strcpy_s(temp,79,*str);
    *(temp + 1) = 'z';

    *str = temp;    

}

void main() {

    char *p = (char*) malloc(79 * sizeof(char));
    p = "hello";
    foo(&p);

    printf("%s", p);
}
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You realize that the first line of main does nothing at all, short of producing an instant memory leak? (The malloc really belongs inside the function foo!) –  Kerrek SB Jan 15 '13 at 23:57
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Change

char temp[79];        # allocated on the stack, vanishes on return

...to...

static char temp[79]; # has a longer lifetime

Also, you don't need the malloc(3).

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But then the function is no longer thread-safe! –  Kerrek SB Jan 16 '13 at 0:02
    
Thanks, this is working. But I still have a question. Why would I need it that temp to be defined as static? I understand that trying to call by value will not work since temp is local.So I am calling by reference, why isn't it enough? –  Steinfeld Jan 16 '13 at 0:06
    
@Kerrek, quite true of course, tho the OP is looking for enlightenment at this point, not grad school, so, one step at a time. He clearly wants to modify a pointer via double indirection and that's a reasonable lesson to proceed with. –  DigitalRoss Jan 16 '13 at 2:27
1  
@Steinfeld, your call by ref was quite correct and is working fine. The problem is: what did you point at? Well, you used the address of a local. It's lifetime-limited to the duration of the function call instance. Specifically, it's allocated on the stack. When the function returns everything is popped off the stack and that memory will be reused on the next function call, and that would be the printf() instance. You need something more persistent if you want it to still be there after foo() returns. –  DigitalRoss Jan 16 '13 at 2:33
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temp is a local variable, which goes out of scope when you exit foo. Thus p is a dangling pointer and your program has undefined behaviour.

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void foo(char **str) {
    // Bad: "temp" doesn't exist when the function returns
    char temp[79];
    strcpy_s(temp,79,*str);
    *(temp + 1) = 'z';

    *str = temp;    

}

void main() {

    char *p = (char*) malloc(79 * sizeof(char));
    p = "hello";
    foo(&p);

    printf("%s", p);
}

This is better:

void foo(char **str) {
    // This should change the pointer ... to something valid outside the function
    *str = (*str) + 1;        
}
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Sorry I couldn't understand your answer. –  Steinfeld Jan 16 '13 at 0:10
    
I was trying to make two points: 1) returning a pointer to "temp" is evil, and 2) it shows one example of changing the pointer. *str = (*str)+1 causes "p" to point to "ello" (instead of "hello"). –  paulsm4 Jan 16 '13 at 0:14
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