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I'm designing a database to hold phones, SIM cards, phone-SIM pairings, and a history of phone-SIM pairings. One phone can only be paired to one SIM card at one time.

My issue is trying to think of a primary key which will uniquely identify a phone-SIM pairing. I've currently got a *comp(ound|osite) key of IMEI and ICCID, but this would be relying on the user not adding a new entry which would break the one phone-one SIM rule.

I could use validation to enforce this rule on the device-SIM pairing table, but would this be bad practice?

Thanks in advance.

*I say this as I'm currently struggling to remember the difference between a compound and a composite key.

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Compound key is one using more than one column. Composite is concatenation of multiple columns. The former can have issue, the latter is an issue. –  Tony Hopkinson Jan 16 '13 at 0:31
    
A composite key is a key with more than one attribute. So is a compound key. In ER terminology however there is a subtle difference between the two, namely that a "compound key" is one whose attributes happen to include a key for some other entity. Use the term composite key unless you mean to refer to the specific ER concept of a compound key. See also: dba.stackexchange.com/questions/3134/… –  sqlvogel Jan 16 '13 at 17:52

2 Answers 2

If you want a history of pairings in the same table. Then an identity primary key will do the job

After all I could move my sim from phone1 to phone2 and then back to phone1.

It's a bit naughty as re-keying the table could move you into an alternate universe... There's an implicit assumption that pair_id increases in the time dimension. Something that could be broken by anything with CRUD access to the table.

You could add a datetime date_paired, but if I swapped my sims very quickly... Good time for two tables, current and history me thinks.

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My issue is trying to think of a primary key which will uniquely identify a phone-SIM pairing. I've currently got a *comp(ound|osite) key of IMEI and ICCID, but this would be relying on the user not adding a new entry which would break the one phone-one SIM rule.

Well, you didn't say the requirement was one phone to one SIM. You said, "One phone can only be paired to one SIM card at one time." (Emphasis added.)

The pair of columns IMEI and ICCID sounds like a fine candidate key for this table. (I'm taking your word; I don't know that much about cell phones and SIM cards.) If you allow users to enter data in the first place, you have to have some business process--probably implemented in application code or SQL--to allow updates, regardless of whether the rule is "one phone/one SIM" or "one phone/one SIM at a time".

Why? Those values are hard to enter correctly.

There's nothing wrong with adding a surrogate ID number after you put the real candidate key in place. There's a lot wrong in adding a surrogate ID number without putting the real candidate key in place.

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