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I don't see a duplicate question to this, but I am sure someone with better search skills than I have will find one. But in the absence, and since I really do what to know:

This question ("use of “if/elseif/else” versus “if/else{if/else}”) exists but is yet to be answered.

How do these practically differ?

// approach one
if (x == 1)
    DoSomething();
else if (x == 2)
    DoSomethingElse();

// approach two
if (x == 1)
    DoSomething();
if (x == 2)
    DoSomethingElse();

Is the resulting IL the same?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 19 down vote accepted

If DoSomething sets x to 2, then they will differ.

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Thank, you. So including else will contain the scope of the overall if so that it executes atomically. This makes sense to me. I should have thought of it. Cheers. –  Jerry Nixon - MSFT Jan 16 '13 at 0:11
2  
@JerryNixon-MSFT: Something like that! Grammatically speaking, the first approach is identical to if(...) { ... } else { if(...) { ... } }. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 16 '13 at 0:12
[STAThread]
public static void Main()
{
    Int32 x = 1;

    if (x == 1)
        Console.WriteLine("1");
    else if (x == 2)
        Console.WriteLine("2");
}

Results in:

.method public hidebysig static void Main() cil managed
{
    .custom instance void [mscorlib]System.STAThreadAttribute::.ctor()
    .entrypoint
    .maxstack 2
    .locals init (
        [0] int32 x)
    L_0000: ldc.i4.1 
    L_0001: stloc.0 
    L_0002: ldloc.0 
    L_0003: ldc.i4.1 
    L_0004: bne.un.s L_0011
    L_0006: ldstr "1"
    L_000b: call void [mscorlib]System.Console::WriteLine(string)
    L_0010: ret 
    L_0011: ldloc.0 
    L_0012: ldc.i4.2 
    L_0013: bne.un.s L_001f
    L_0015: ldstr "2"
    L_001a: call void [mscorlib]System.Console::WriteLine(string)
    L_001f: ret 
}

While:

[STAThread]
public static void Main()
{
    Int32 x = 1;

    if (x == 1)
        Console.WriteLine("1");

    if (x == 2)
        Console.WriteLine("2");
}

Results in:

.method public hidebysig static void Main() cil managed
{
    .custom instance void [mscorlib]System.STAThreadAttribute::.ctor()
    .entrypoint
    .maxstack 2
    .locals init (
        [0] int32 x)
    L_0000: ldc.i4.1 
    L_0001: stloc.0 
    L_0002: ldloc.0 
    L_0003: ldc.i4.1 
    L_0004: bne.un.s L_0010
    L_0006: ldstr "1"
    L_000b: call void [mscorlib]System.Console::WriteLine(string)
    L_0010: ldloc.0 
    L_0011: ldc.i4.2 
    L_0012: bne.un.s L_001e
    L_0014: ldstr "2"
    L_0019: call void [mscorlib]System.Console::WriteLine(string)
    L_001e: ret 
}

IL code is a little bit different and here is the main difference:

Approach One: L_0004: bne.un.s L_0011 -> L_0011: ldloc.0 with L_0010: ret 
Approach Two: L_0004: bne.un.s L_0010 -> L_0010: ldloc.0 with no ret in between

When you use else statement, as in first approach, only the first branch that meets the condition will be run. On the other hand... with the second approach every check is processed and every check that meets the condition will be followed and processed. That's the main difference.

That's why in the first approach's IL code you have a "ret" directive just after the call of Console.WriteLine while in the second it's not present. In the first case the method can be exited just after a check has been passed because no more checks on x will be performed... in the second approach you have to follow all of them sequentially and that's why ret is only appearing at the end of the method, no "shortcuts" to the end.

For my test i used a Console.WriteLine() call... but it's sure that if DoSomething() involves a value change of x variable, the difference will be absolutely more important in the code behavior. Let's say that we have x as a private static member (initial value always 1) instead of a local variable and:

public void DoSomething()
{
    ++m_X;
}

In the first approach, even if m_X assumes a value of 2 after DoSomething() is called thanks to the first check, else will make the method exit and DoSomethingElse() will never be called. In the second approach both methods will be called.

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Note that there is no else if construct in C#. Your first code sample is exactly the same as:

if (x == 1)
    DoSomething();
else 
{
    if (x == 2)
        DoSomethingElse();
}

Since there is only one statement in else, the braces can be omitted, and for enhanced readability, if is usually written on the same line as the preceding else. Writing multiple "else if" statements is equivalent to further nesting:

if (x == 1)
    DoSomething();
else 
{
    if (x == 2)
        DoSomethingElse();
    else
    {
        if (x == 3)
            YetSomethingElse();
        else
        {
            if (x == 4)
               ReallyDifferent();
        }
    }
}

The above can be written as:

if (x == 1)
    DoSomething();
else if (x == 2)
    DoSomethingElse();
else if (x == 3)
    YetSomethingElse();
else if (x == 4)
    ReallyDifferent();

From this, you can see that chaining "else if" and if can produce different results. In case of "else if", the first branch that satisfies the condition will be executed, and after that no further checks are done. In case of chained if statements, all branches that satisfy their conditions are executed.

The main difference here is when execution of a branch causes a subsequent condition to become true. For example:

   var x = 1;

   if (x == 1)
       x = 2;
   else if (x == 2)
       x = 3;

VS

   var x = 1;

   if (x == 1)
       x = 2;

   if (x == 2)
       x = 3;

In the first case, x == 2, while in the second case x == 3.

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If x changes (in Do Seomthing and DoSomethingElse) then the first statement will only ever execute one statement. In the 2nd example every statement will be checked (unless of course the compiler optimizes it to a jump table for number comparison).

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When you use else statement, only one of the branches will be run (i.e. the first, which meets the if condition). All other if conditions won't even be estimated:

// approach one
int x = 1;
if (x == 1)
    DoSomething(); //only this will be run, even if `DoSomething` changes `x` to 2
else if (x == 2)
    DoSomethingElse();

While when you don't use it each of them may be run (depending on each of the conditions), i.e. each of them is estimated one by one:

// approach two
int x = 1;
if (x == 1)
    DoSomething();//this is run, as `x` == 1
if (x == 2)
    DoSomethingElse();//if `DoSomething` changes `x` to 2, this is run as well

So, IL may differ.

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Perhaps replace x == 2 with x < 2 to show why. –  Cole Johnson Jan 16 '13 at 0:09

If x is modified by multiple threads it is possible that DoSomething() and DoSomethingElse() will both get called with the second approach

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No anwsers about performance?

So if x=1 then you do only one check in first case, and in second case you do 2 checks, so first case is faster.

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When you use multiple else if, it will execute the condition that meets. If there are remaining cases, they will be skipped. When you have multiple if, it will check every statement. So this becomes more of a performance issue.

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When you code like this

// approach two
if (x == 1)
    DoSomething();
if (x == 2)
    DoSomethingElse();

Everytime the condition checks.

But when you code like this

if (x == 1)
    DoSomething();
else if (x == 2)
    DoSomethingElse();

If the first condition is true then it wont check next else if condition and thus decrease unnecessary compiling.

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Thank you, Ravi. I appreciate your contribution to this discussion. And, you are 100% correct. That's how it works. –  Jerry Nixon - MSFT Nov 11 '14 at 7:09

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