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I'm attempting to convert MySQL timestamps in an ActiveRecord object to another timestamp format. My method takes an array of ActiveRecord records and returns an array of hashes with the timestamped fields with the formatted timestamp:

def convert_mysql_timestamps(records)
    ary = []
    hash = {}
    records.each_with_index do |record, i|
      record.attributes.each do |field, value|
        if time_columns.include?(field) and value then
          hash[field] = value.strftime("%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%S%z")
        else
          hash[field] = value
        end
      end
      ary[i] = {}
      ary[i] = hash
    end
    ary
  end

However, when in the ary[i] = hash assignment, all ary elements get set to hash.

Is there a better way to convert a record's timestamp fields? (I don't need to save the records back to the database.) Also, how can I get the array to capture each individual hash representation of the record?

Input:

[#<Vehicle id: 15001, approved_at: "2011-03-28 10:16:31", entry_date: "2011-03-28 10:16:31">, #<Vehicle id: 15002, approved_at: "2011-03-28 10:16:31", entry_date: "2011-03-28 10:16:31">]

Desired output:

[{"id"=>15001, "approved_at"=>"2011-03-28T10:16:31-0700", "entry_date"=>"2011-03-28T10:16:31-0700"}, {"id"=>15002, "approved_at"=>"2011-03-28T10:16:31-0700", "entry_date"=>"2011-03-28T10:16:31-0700"}]
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2  
Providing a code that does not work is not helpful to understand the question. It is simply a burden to the reader to have to read such thing. Providing an example input and expected output is much more helpful. –  sawa Jan 16 '13 at 0:21
1  
A sample initial dataset would also be helpful. –  Dan Jan 16 '13 at 0:23
    
Perhaps your hash = {} should be inside your each_with_index block. –  mu is too short Jan 16 '13 at 0:58
    
Input and desired output added. –  Sly Jan 16 '13 at 1:09
    
@mu is too short - you are correct. Declaring the hash inside the each_with_index block fixed it. Thank you! If you reply with your response, I'll check it. –  Sly Jan 16 '13 at 1:10
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is that you're creating one Hash:

def convert_mysql_timestamps(records)
  ary = []
  hash = {}
  #...

and then trying to re-use for each record. You probably want a fresh Hash for each each_with_index iteration:

  def convert_mysql_timestamps(records)
    ary = []
    records.each_with_index do |record, i|
      hash = { }
      record.attributes.each do |field, value|
        #...
      end
      ary[i] = hash
    end
  end
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You can use map for this - it's always a good option when you want to take an array in one format and produce a same-sized array in another. Here's how:

def convert_mysql_timestamps(records)
  records.map do |record|
    Hash[records.attributes.map{|k, v| [k, convert_mysql_timestamp(v)] }]
  end
end

def convert_mysql_timestamp(field, value)
  return value unless time_columns.include?(field) && value
  value.strftime("%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%S%z")
end

It works like so:

  • Hash[array_of_pairs] turns an array of key-value pairs - like [["foo", 2], ["bar", 3], ...] - into a hash like {"foo" => 2, "bar" => 3, ...}.

  • map calls its block for each item in the collection, and collects each return value of the block into a new array, which it returns. The attributes.map inside the Hash[...] creates the array of key-value pairs, and the outer records.map collects up all the hashes into the returned array.

I'd suggest reading up on the methods in Enumerable because there are so many neat things like map in there. You will find that you almost never have to use indices in your loops, although if you're coming from another language with for loops everywhere it's a hard habit to break!

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Andy - thank you for your contribution. I like your "less-is-more" code. I promised I'd give this one to mu is too short since he responded first. –  Sly Jan 16 '13 at 15:59
    
No problem - even if you don't accept it, you're welcome to up vote it if it was helpful :) –  Andy H Jan 16 '13 at 16:10
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I am not sure what your time_columns are, but assuming they are Time class, you can simplify the part like value.is_a?(Time).

def convert_mysql_timestamps(records)

 records.collect do |record|
   # assuming records are from a Rails model, I am using #attributes 
   # to loop through all fields in a record 
                    # then inject values in this hash -> ({}), 
                    # which is in the block, named attributes
   record.attributes.inject({}) do |attributes, (column_name, value)|
     # if it is Time, convert it to iso8601 (slightly different from your format, 
     # but if this is also acceptable, your code can be simpler)
     attributes[column_name] = (value.is_a?(Time) ? value.iso8601 : value)
     attributes
   end
 end

end
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kukrt - thanks for you're nicely improved code example. It works great! Gave this one to mu is too short, because he responded first. –  Sly Jan 16 '13 at 16:18
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