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According to the angular.js source:

$q promises are recognized by the templating engine in angular, which means that in templates you can treat promises attached to a scope as if they were the resulting values.

So, I have a controller that gets a list of categories from the backend,

function myController($scope, $categoryService) {
...
  $scope.categoriesList = categoryService.search().then(function(response) {
    return response;
  }
...
}

and in my template I have a select:

<select multiple ng-model="categories" ng-options="category.name for category in categoriesList"></select>

which "works" in the browser (the select shows a populated list)

but how do you test this?

I have the following spec:

it('populates the categoriesList from the categoryService', inject(function(categoryService, $q, $controller, $rootScope) {
  var $scope = $rootScope.$new();
  var catList = [{id:1, name:"Animal"},{id:2, name:"Vegetable"}];
  var deferred = $q.defer()
  spyOn(categoryService, 'search').andReturn(deferred.promise);

  $controller(myController, {'$scope': $scope});
  expect(categoryService.search).toHaveBeenCalled(); // PASSES

  deferred.resolve(catList);
  $scope.$digest();

  expect($scope.categoriesList).toEqual(catList); // FAILS, returns the promise instead
}));

If I rewrote my initializer like so

...then(function(response) {
  $scope.categoriesList = response;
}

My tests will pass, but then I'm not assigning the promise to the scope, and the template engine isn't resolving the promise for me. It seems to me that the first implementation is what is intended by the framework, but it's not testable. The second implementation is testable, but not the intended way to attach data to a scope.

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2 Answers 2

When you say

$scope.categoriesList = categoryService.search().then(function(response) {
  return response;
}

$scope.categoriesList is not assigned response; instead, it is assigned a new promise, which resolves to response (as indicated by your test). Since the original promise already resolved to response, you could just have:

$scope.categoriesList = categoryService.search()

What the docs mean is, you can assign $scope.categoriesList to a promise like this, and the view will treat the expression categoriesList as the value it resolves to (in this case, response)--it doesn't actually take that value and assign it to the scope.

[Update]

If you're testing the controller, and not the categoryService itself, I would leave the promise out of it entirely--probably something like this:

it('populates the categoriesList from the categoryService', inject(function(categoryService, $controller, $rootScope) {
  var $scope = $rootScope.$new();
  var catList = [{id:1, name:"Animal"},{id:2, name:"Vegetable"}];
  spyOn(categoryService, 'search').andReturn(catList);

  $controller(myController, {'$scope': $scope});
  expect(categoryService.search).toHaveBeenCalled();

  $scope.$digest();

  expect($scope.categoriesList).toEqual(catList);
}));
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Thanks for the response. Any thoughts on how to write a test for this behavior? –  Ken Mayer Jan 16 '13 at 23:42
    
I've added some notes on testing. –  Brandon Tilley Jan 17 '13 at 2:59
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I had the same problem and ended up doing like this in my test:

it("leaves a 'countries' promise that resolves to countries in the scope", function() {
  var value = null;
  scope.countries.then(function(v) {
    value = v;
  });
  scope.$apply();
  expect(value).toEqual([{ Code: "SE", Name: "Sweden" }]);
});

Countries instead of categories, but the same technique should work in your case.

(I omitted the beforeEach that creates the scope variable and sets up a GET expectation using $httpBackend, but they are needed of course.)

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