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I have a 3D list (3 nested lists), and for each item in the list, I need to find the adjacent items. Currently, I'm creating an array for each adjacent item, and storing that in each item. This is pretty resource intensive, so I'm looking to simplify it a bit.

I was considering using this approach:

for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++)
{
    switch (i)
    {
        case (0):
            mapCell neighbor = myMap.Depth[z].Rows[x].Columns[y - 1];
        case (1):
            mapCell neighbor = myMap.Depth[z].Rows[x].Columns[y + 1];
        case (2):
            mapCell neighbor = myMap.Depth[z].Rows[x - 1].Columns[y];
        case (3):
            mapCell neighbor = myMap.Depth[z].Rows[x + 1].Columns[y];
        case (4):
            mapCell neighbor = myMap.Depth[z].Rows[x + 1].Columns[y + 1];
        case (5):
            mapCell neighbor = myMap.Depth[z].Rows[x + 1].Columns[y - 1];
        case (6):
            mapCell neighbor = myMap.Depth[z].Rows[x - 1].Columns[y + 1];
        case (7):
            mapCell neighbor = myMap.Depth[z].Rows[x - 1].Columns[y - 1];
    }

    // do some stuff with the neighbor here
}

This is a lot better than what I have now in terms of performance, but I'm wondering if there is an easier way to accomplish this? It seems a bit messy, and I really feel like there would be a way to do this in 1 line, but I just cant figure out the math.

edit: Sorry, I may have omitted some important details. The code which works with the "neighbor" variable has been left out, as its very long and doesnt help with the solution. I do not need to maintain a list of the "neighbor" variables (Thats what I am currently doing, and it uses far too much memory (around 400megs). I just need a quick way to look at each item, find each of the adjacent 8 items, do something with them one at a time, and then move onto the next node. The above code will work to go through them, but it doesnt feel like the most optimized way to accomplish this.

share|improve this question
    
When you say "adjacent items", do you mean that your input is a sparse array? You might want to consider using an adjacency list, instead. –  Pheonixblade9 Jan 16 '13 at 0:46
    
The list is 3D (3 nested lists), so by adjacent, i mean if you were to visualize the layout of the item indexes, the items to the left, right, top, bottom, and the 4 corners. –  Unicorno Marley Jan 16 '13 at 1:35
    
Looks like you are find the nearest neighbours in each 2D slice of your data structure (ignoring neighbours in layers above and below), is that right? –  Ergwun Jan 16 '13 at 1:44
    
Ah, your edit clarifies that. I get your question now. –  Ergwun Jan 16 '13 at 1:45
    
Are you in a position to store your matrix "flattened"? That is, one contiguous array? –  JerKimball Jan 16 '13 at 1:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It looks like you are actually finding neighbours in the 2D array at a given depth in your 3D data structure. I.e. you are ignoring neigbours at adjacent depths.

Your approach is probably pretty performant. You could find some fancier way that involves less typing, e.g. this answer to a similar question on SO, but I doubt it will be faster.

Obviously you also need to include some checks in your code to handle items at the edge which won't have 8 neighbours.

private void DoSomethingWithNeighbours(int x, int y, int z)
{
    foreach (var neighbout in this.GetNeighbours(x, y, z)
    {
        // ...
    }
}

private IEnumerable<Item> GetNeighbours(int x, int y, int z)
{
    if (x > 0)
    {
        if (y > 0)
        {
            yield return myMap.Depth[z].Rows[x - 1].Columns[y - 1];
        }

        yield return myMap.Depth[z].Rows[x - 1].Columns[y];

        if (y < ColumnCount - 1)
        {
            yield return myMap.Depth[z].Rows[x - 1].Columns[y + 1];
        }
    }

    if (y > 0)
    {
        yield return myMap.Depth[z].Rows[x].Columns[y - 1];
    }

    if (y < ColumnCount - 1)
    {
        yield return myMap.Depth[z].Rows[x].Columns[y + 1];
    }

    if (x < RowCount - 1)
    {
        if (y > 0)
        {
            yield return myMap.Depth[z].Rows[x + 1].Columns[y - 1];
        }

        yield return myMap.Depth[z].Rows[x + 1].Columns[y];

        if (y < ColumnCount - 1)
        {
            yield return myMap.Depth[z].Rows[x + 1].Columns[y + 1];
        }
    }
}

Or the following alternative which is rather more concise, with only a marginal performance cost:

private IEnumerable<int> GetNeighbours2(int x, int y, int z)
{
    for (int i = x - 1; i <= x + 1; ++i)
    {
        for (int j = y - 1; j <= y + 1; ++j)
        {
            if (i >= 0 && i < Rows && j >= 0 && j < Cols && !(i == x && j == y))
            {
                yield return myMap.Depth[z].Rows[i].Columns[j];
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I dont need to build the list of items, I already have it. I just need to iterate through it and find the adjacent nodes. The "performance" issue comes from having 400,000 nodes (100 items in the top list, 200 items in each of the lower lists) and using an array with an index size of 8 in each one to store the location of its neighbors. Rather than doing that, I can just temporarily set each one to "neighbor", check it for some variables, then reset it. I dont need to maintain list of the neighbors, because I can look at them "as needed" in this way. –  Unicorno Marley Jan 16 '13 at 1:36
    
@UnicornoMarley I wasn't refering to building the list of items, I was refering to building a list of neighbours. What actually is your question then? –  Ergwun Jan 16 '13 at 1:43
    
Im wondering if there is a more efficient way to iterate through each neighbor, rather than 8 separate case statements. –  Unicorno Marley Jan 16 '13 at 1:46

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