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I need to create the following matrix using only a single command without typing it out explicitly:

M = [0 0 0 0 0 0;...
     0 0 0 0 0 0;...
     0 0 0 0 0 0;...
     0 0 0 1 2 3;...
     0 0 0 4 5 6;....
     0 0 0 7 8 9]

I'm new at this so I can't use any complicated commands.

I tried to use linspace combined with zeros but it didn't work out very well.

Please help!!

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2  
What is the basis of this requirement? –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 16 '13 at 1:48
1  
by single command do you mean a single line? –  bla Jan 16 '13 at 4:21
1  
I'll +1 this question if a motivation would be provided: why is this "single command" requirement? –  Shai Jan 16 '13 at 7:35

6 Answers 6

If the matrix M is not defined yet, you may skip the zeros(6) (proposed by AlexL) and go straight to

M( 4:6, 4:6 ) = reshape( 1:9, [3 3] ).'; %'
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Is that using too complicated commands?

ans=padarray(reshape(1:9,3,3)',[3 3],'pre')
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1  
+1 very elegant! –  Shai Jan 16 '13 at 6:22
    
elegant or not, in my view your answer is better... (+1) –  bla Jan 16 '13 at 7:42

Don't know about Matlab, but in Octave, you can do:

M = [zeros(3, 6); zeros(3), [1:3; 4:6; 7:9]]
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Another easy and compact oneliner, combining some of the things already mentioned for MATLAB and Octave:

M(4:6,4:6) = [1:3;4:6;7:9]
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Perhaps you could try creating a 6x6 matrix full of zeros:

M = zeros(6)

Then just setting part of it to 1:9?

M(4:6,4:6) = reshape(1:9, 3, 3)' 

(The ' symbol means transpose)

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(This is untested, so I'd appreciate it if someone could tell me if this doesn't work) –  Alex L Jan 16 '13 at 1:53
    
Doesn't quite work. This ends up with a transposed array. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 16 '13 at 1:57
    
My MatLab complains about the dimension mismatch. I do: M(4:6,4:6) = transpose(reshape(1:9, 3, 3)). But that might come under 'complicated commands'. –  paddy Jan 16 '13 at 1:58
    
Thanks @paddy, reshaping then transposing it should do the trick. –  Alex L Jan 16 '13 at 2:15
3  
@Shai I interpreted "one command" as "a simple solution" (I ignore silly requirements, my boss hates me) –  Alex L Jan 16 '13 at 8:10

Correcting Alex's answer:

M = zeros(6)

M(4:6,4:6) = [1,2,3;4,5,6;7,8,9]
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How does this answer the question? This is not exactly a single command solution... –  Shai Jan 16 '13 at 6:34
    
this is the simplest way! –  Abhishek Thakur Jan 16 '13 at 8:00

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