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I am designing an online marketplace for a complex auction website.

Given the potential of growth and complexity of each database, I am separating the databases of members and products. The question is what to do with referential integrity between two separate databases? The relationships can be one-to-one or one-to-many. I have read quite a bit about using triggers, replicating tables as read-only from one database to another; obviously not to end up with orphan rows.

I know that there are similar questions on the site but none have a concrete answer.

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I am also considering using server side application code to keep things in check instead of using triggers. –  Hamada Jan 16 '13 at 2:10

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Given the potential of growth and complexity of each database, I am separating the databases of members and products. The question is what to do with referential integrity between two separate databases?

This might be a defensible strategy, or it might be a disaster. It depends in part on your dbms. In most cases, you'd approach this kind of problem with multiple schemas, not multiple databases. (In this sense, a schema is what you get when you run a CREATE SCHEMA statement.) Foreign key references work fine in multiple schemas. Many dbms that support multiple SQL schemas don't support simple foreign key references to other database.

MySQL doesn't support CREATE SCHEMA. Instead, MySQL databases behave much like SQL schemas.

CREATE SCHEMA is a synonym for CREATE DATABASE.

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I could not agree more with you about using schemas. I am using SQL Server 2008 R2. I just do not understand how separation does not greatly improve the performance. When one database has so many concurrent connections, how is it able to handle all the requests? I doubt that AT&T keeps all phone logs of all subscribers under the same database. They must have separated them by area code or something of that nature. --- BTW, as far as my question goes: I am talking about having seperate databases on the same instance for now. –  Hamada Jan 16 '13 at 16:53
    
SQL Server doesn't support foreign keys across databases. Your best solution is to keep the tables in the same database, and use foreign key references to maintain data integrity. Your worst choice to try to maintain data integrity across multiple databases using application code. What performance problem do you have right now? –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Jan 16 '13 at 18:49
    
Thanks for the valuable tip about SQL Server. Does that mean that I cannot relate tables this way: where database_name.table_name.column_name (PK) = database_name.table_name.column_name (FK) in SQL Server? I will give that a try now as I have never actually done that before. I have taken your advice along with others and will use a single database for now. My performance issues are really not there right now. I am planning for anticipated future growth. I guess if I ever get to that point, then there is nothing money cannot buy as far as hiring the best DBA in the future. –  Hamada Jan 18 '13 at 18:24
    
The question of using multiple databases really arose when I was working on a clients’ eBay store and was listing 10000 products in bulk, then I realized that the data was actually being updated gradually in stages and not in real time… Then I thought, eBay must be using multiple databases and what is happening is that they are replicating tables from one database table to another, thus the gradual update of the products to the front end store. –  Hamada Jan 18 '13 at 18:24
    
"I realized that the data was actually being updated gradually in stages and not in real time… Then I thought, eBay must be using multiple databases and what is happening is that they are replicating tables..." Not likely. Many dozens of reasons that might suggest "not in real time", and few of them have to do with multiple databases. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Jan 18 '13 at 18:58

Don't separate. The processing power of database depends on processing power of your server on which the database is hosted on. If there are 2 different schemas then you may probably think of separating for whatever reasons. For same schema eligible objects I would suggest not to separate but to host in a better powered server.

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I would love to so Satish. It makes my life so much easier. I never took a project so large. Say I have 1 million users and 90 million products in the same database and 200+ tables, then would this become a major issue later other than faster and bigger hardware or would all these queries on the same db simple kill the performance. It becomes an issue of performance rather than maxing out the maximums on the SQL Server. –  Hamada Jan 16 '13 at 2:18
    
When you try have those many users and products not all users will be active and not all products will be associated with user. Split the table into LIVE_USERS and PASSIVE_USERS. Similarly LIVE_PRODUCTS and PASSIVE_PRODUCTS. Then put the PASSIVE_USERS and PASSIVE_PRODUCTS in a separate database and I presume on separate server. It don't think you can improve performance just by storing USERS and PRODUCTS all in separate database. –  Satish Jan 16 '13 at 2:45
    
That's not a bad idea but you want inactive or discontinued products to still show online to get the traffic, thus it will still use database resources. As far as user listings, you are right, many of them will become inactive and should be moved to an archive table. I am still not 100% sure. I keep reading online and the entire dba community is split 50/50 on this same topic. –  Hamada Jan 16 '13 at 17:05
    
When I mean PASSIVE_PRODUCTS, I didn't mean retired products. I meant those products which are not associated with any users. –  Satish Jan 17 '13 at 4:00

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