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I have a program that uses a default name and password. I'm using argparse to allow the user to specify command line options, and I would like to enable the user to provide the program with a different name and password to use. So I have the following:

parser.add_argument(
    '-n',
    '--name',
    help='the login name that you wish the program to use'
    )

parser.add_argument(
    '-p',
    '--password',
    help='the password to log in with.'
    )

But it doesn't make any sense to specify only the name or only the password, but it would make sense to specify neither one. I noticed that argparse does have the ability to specify that two arguments are mutually exclusive. But what I have are two arguments that must appear together. How do I get this behavior? (I found "argument groups" mentioned in the docs, but they don't appear to solve my problem http://docs.python.org/2/library/argparse.html#argument-groups)

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And I assume that post-processing the arguments is out the the question? –  mgilson Jan 16 '13 at 2:14
    
Nothing is out of the question. I just want argparse to do the work for me and tell the user that the options must appear together. –  Jon Crowell Jan 16 '13 at 2:20
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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I believe that the best way to handle this is to post-process the returned namespace. The reason that argparse doesn't support this is because it parses arguments 1 at a time. It's easy for argparse to check to see if something was already parsed (which is why mutually-exclusive arguments work), but it isn't easy to see if something will be parsed in the future.

A simple:

parser.add_argument('-n','--name',...,default=None)
parser.add_argument('-p','--password',...,default=None)
ns = parser.parse_args()

if len([x for x in (ns.name,ns.password) if x is not None]) == 1:
   parser.error('--name and --password must be given together')

name = ns.name if ns.name is not None else "default_name"
password = ns.password if ns.password is not None else "default_password"

seems like it would suffice.

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Thanks, this seems to work beautifully for me. –  Jon Crowell Jan 16 '13 at 2:44
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This is probably how I'd do it. Since you have existing defaults with the option to change, define the defaults, but don't use them as your argument defaults:

default_name = "x"
default_pass = "y"
parser.add_argument(
    '-n',
    '--name',
    default=None,
    help='the login name that you wish the program to use'
    )

parser.add_argument(
    '-p',
    '--password',
    default=None,
    help='the password to log in with.'
    )
args = parser.parse_args()
if all(i is not None for i in [args.name, args.password]):
    name = args.name
    passwd = args.password
elif any(i is not None for i in [args.name, args.password]):
    parser.error("Both Name and Password are Required!")
else:
    name = default_name
    passwd = default_pass
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Careful with this one. What if the user sets up their password to an empty string? –  mgilson Jan 16 '13 at 2:32
    
As a side note, you can always edit your deleted answer and un-delete it :) –  mgilson Jan 16 '13 at 2:33
    
Thanks, it is kind of annoying to have it hanging there. –  monkut Jan 16 '13 at 2:35
    
Well, more to the point, if you were to get 10 votes and the checkmark, you might get an enlightened badge :) –  mgilson Jan 16 '13 at 2:37
1  
thanks, and updated with the check for None, instead of Falseness. –  monkut Jan 16 '13 at 2:39
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