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I got confused understanding the usage of the volatile keyword in Java. I have read many articles on the internet but am still getting nowhere. There are many questions in my head that I would like to ask:

First of all, Wikipedia and many blogs say that all volatile variables are stored in a Thread-Local memory over the main memory shared by all threads! I'm a little bit confused, are they meaning the stack memory? I know each thread has his own stack memory where it stores its own primitive literals & objects references.

If so, then what happen if the volatile variable is an object reference and not a primitive literal? I guess all the objects are stored in the heap space and not in the stack memory.

Second, could you please explain in details using an example how the volatile keyword works and when we are supposed to use it?

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closed as not constructive by Mark Peters, Jayan, talonmies, Jesus Ramos, IceMAN Jan 16 '13 at 6:39

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Exactly where did you read that volatile variables are stored in thread-local memory? I see no such assertion in the Wikipedia entry. –  Mark Peters Jan 16 '13 at 3:49
    
"Wikipedia and many blogs say that all volatile variables are stored in a Thread-Local memory over the main memory shared by all threads!". Please provide citations with links. This sounds wrong. –  Stephen C Jan 16 '13 at 3:50
    
The Java Tutorials: Atomic Access and Java theory and practice: Managing volatility are better places to read about volatile than wikipedia. –  Nivas Jan 16 '13 at 3:53
    
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volatile_variable#In_Java : does not state what you said. –  Jayan Jan 16 '13 at 4:18
    
I guess i did a big mistake, i'd have to say that volatile variables are stored within the main memory and not the thread-local memory as it's said in this article : javamex.com/tutorials/synchronization_volatile.shtml My appologies. @Stephen C : up here's an example talking about the thread-local memory. Now, what's the difference between a Thread local memory and a process cache memory ?! –  ayoubuntu Jan 16 '13 at 4:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

First of all, Wikipedia and many blogs say that all volatile variables are stored in a Thread-Local memory over the main memory shared by all threads.

That is incorrect. Volatile fields are instance or class (static) variables and are stored in the heap.

They might be referring to cache memory that is specific to a single processor / core ... but that is a hardware-specific thing. But this is definitely not "thread-local". That term means something entirely different.

If so, then what happen if the volatile variable is an object reference and not a primitive literal?

Nothing special. Your assumptions are incorrect. Volatile variables are not stored on the stack.

I know each thread has his own stack memory where it stores its own primitive literals & objects references.

What is stored on the thread's stack is:

  • the method's local variables,
  • the method's parameters,
  • the method's return address etc so that the CPU knows where to go when the call returns, and (possibly)
  • state of local objects that the JIT compiler has figured don't need to be stored in the heap.

A method's primitive literals are typically embedded in the code itself. String literals are elsewhere too. (When those literals are assigned to local variables they will be held on the stack ...)

Second, could you please explain in details using an example how the volatile keyword works and when we are supposed to use it?

Check the comments, and the related questions ... or Google "java volatile example". An explanation would be redundant.

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+1 for ur ans. however you didn't mention reference values for objects created inside the method in "What is stored on the thread's stack is:". Is it mean object created within method will be stored in stack itshelf? not in heap ? –  Kanagavelu Sugumar May 30 '14 at 11:56
    
References for objects created in a method don't need any special mention. They may be stored in local variables (on the stack ... already covered), or in class variables, instance variables or arrays (in the heap). –  Stephen C May 30 '14 at 12:14
    
My last bullet point refers to a particular optimization that some JIT compilers may perform if "escape analysis" is enabled. In this case, the entire object is stored in stack memory. This optimization may be performed if the JIT compiler can deduce that the object in question cannot "escape" from the current method. –  Stephen C May 30 '14 at 12:18

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