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I haven't used C in a long time and apparently I've forgotten more than I thought. While attempting to use malloc() to allocate a string, I keep getting the old data for that string, including it's old, longer length when the requested space is shorter. The circumstance do include the pointer to the string being free()'d and set to NULL. Here is a sample run of what I see in my terminal:

yes, quit, or other            (<-message from program)
oooo                           (<-user input; this will be put to upper case and token'd)

------uIT LENGTH:4             (<-debug message showing length of userInputToken)

preC--tmp:                     (<-contents of tmp variable)

pstC--tmp:OOOO                 (<-contents of temp variable)
bad input                      (<-program response)
yes, quit, or other
yes

------uIT LENGTH:3

preC--tmp:OOOO                 (<-: tmp = malloc(sizeof(char)*(strlen(userInputToken)-1)); )

pstC--tmp:YESO                 (<-: strncpy(tmp,userInputToken,strlen(userInputToken)-1);  )
bad input
yes, quit, or other
yes

------uIT LENGTH:3

preC--tmp:YESO

pstC--tmp:YESO
bad input
yes, quit, or other
quit

------uIT LENGTH:4

preC--tmp:YESO

pstC--tmp:QUIT                 (<-: Successful quit because I only did 4 chars; if 5 were used, this would have failed)

As you can see, strlen(userInputToken) gets the correct length and it is used to get the correct number of characters copied – but either free() or malloc() doesn't seem to care about it. I can't figure out what's going on here! Is this a punishment for leaving C for Python?

What's more, the tmp variable should be cleared regardless of free() because it is limited by its scope. Here is the code where everything goes down:

In main.c:

void run() {
    outputFlagContainer *outputFlags = malloc(sizeof(outputFlagContainer));

    while(true) {
        puts("yes, quit, or other");
        outputFlags = getUserInput(outputFlags);
        if (outputFlags->YES) {
            puts("It was a yes!");
        } else if (outputFlags->QUIT) {
            break;
        } else {
            puts("bad input");
        }
    }

    free(outputFlags);
}

In messsageParserPieces.h:

outputFlagContainer *getUserInput(outputFlagContainer *outputFlags) {
    outputFlags = resetOutputFlags(outputFlags);
    char *userInput = NULL;
    char user_input[MAX_INPUT];
    char *userInputToken = NULL;
    char *tmp = NULL;
    char *finalCharacterCheck = NULL;

    // Tokens to search for:
    char QUIT[] = "QUIT";
    char YES[] = "YES";

    userInput = fgets(user_input, MAX_INPUT-1, stdin);
    int i = 0;
    while(userInput[i]) {
        userInput[i] = toupper(userInput[i]);
        i++;
    }

    userInputToken = strtok(userInput, " ");
    if (userInputToken) {
        finalCharacterCheck = strchr(userInputToken, '\n');
        if (finalCharacterCheck) {
            int MEOW = strlen(userInputToken)-1; // DEBUG LINE
            printf("\n------uIT LENGTH:%d\n", MEOW); // DEBUG LINE

            // The problem appears to happen here and under the circumstances that
            // userInput is (for example) 4 characters and then after getUserInput()
            // is called again, userInput is 3 characters long. 
            tmp = malloc(sizeof(char)*(strlen(userInputToken)-1));
            if (tmp == NULL) {
                exit(1);
            }

            printf("\npreC--tmp:%s\n", tmp); // This shows that the malloc DOES NOT use the given length.

            strncpy(tmp,userInputToken,strlen(userInputToken)-1);

            printf("\npstC--tmp:%s\n", tmp); // Copies in the correct number of characters.

            userInputToken = tmp;
            free(tmp);
            tmp = NULL;
        }
    }

    while (userInputToken != NULL) { // NULL = NO (more) tokens.
        if (0 == strcmp(userInputToken, YES)) {
            outputFlags->YES = true;
        } else if (0 == strcmp(userInputToken, QUIT)) {
            outputFlags->QUIT = true;
        }

        userInputToken = strtok(NULL, " ");
        if (userInputToken) {
            finalCharacterCheck = strchr(userInputToken, '\n');
            if (finalCharacterCheck) {
                tmp = malloc(sizeof(char)*(strlen(userInputToken)-1));
                if (tmp == NULL) {
                    exit(1);
                }
                strncpy(tmp,userInputToken,strlen(userInputToken)-1);
                userInputToken = tmp;
                free(tmp);
                tmp = NULL;
            }
        }
    }
    return outputFlags;
}

I'm assuming this is some kind of obvious error, but I've tried googling it for about 2 hours tonight. I can't think of how to search this that doesn't bring up a malloc() tutorial – and I have looked at a couple already.

Any insight at all would be greatly appreciated!

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1  
You wanted to allocate memory for a strong but what is outputFlagContainer I guess its a structure correct me if I am wrong Also where exactly is the issue messsageParserPieces.h or main.c? –  nimish Jan 16 '13 at 4:17
    
outputFlagContainer is a strict that contains a couple of bool variables. They are used to store the gist of what the user is saying. I can add the code for that if you believe it would be beneficial. I will highlight where the problem is occurring above. –  sikrob Jan 16 '13 at 4:20
1  
strncpy does not copy the terminating null byte to the buffer so after strncpy(tmp,userInputToken,strlen(userInputToken)-1); do tmp[strlen(userInputToken)]='\0'); While allocating alloc with strlen(userInputToken) thats required + 1 extra byte for the null character –  nimish Jan 16 '13 at 4:36
    
there are serious issues in the code especially when you play with userInputToken and tmp and their assignments. And what does resetOutputFlags function do ? reset the structure? –  nimish Jan 16 '13 at 5:37
    
outputFlags is a struct that contains bool elements; resetOutputFlags sets those elements to false. paddy set me straight on proper assignment of userInputToken and tmp below (I have addressed this by using strcpy to set userInputToken's contents). C is a fun language. –  sikrob Jan 16 '13 at 13:00
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
tmp = malloc(sizeof(char)*(strlen(userInputToken)-1));
if (tmp == NULL) {
    exit(1);
}

printf("\npreC--tmp:%s\n", tmp); // This shows that the malloc DOES NOT use the given length.

strncpy(tmp,userInputToken,strlen(userInputToken)-1);
printf("\npstC--tmp:%s\n", tmp); // Copies in the correct number of characters.

This snippet shows that you expect tmp to be initialised with something. This is not true. You must initialise your memory after allocating it. That's what you do with strncpy.

There's also a problem because you are not allocating enough bytes to hold the string, therefore you cannot display it with a plain %s format specifier. You are allocating strlen(userInputToken)-1 bytes and copying that same number. That means there's no room for a null character, and strncpy will consequently not terminate your string. You should always add one more byte, and if the NULL character will not be copied by strncpy then you must set it yourself:

size_t length = strlen(userInputToken)-1;
tmp = malloc(length + 1);
strncpy(tmp, userInputToken, length);
tmp[length] = 0;

So, just to be clear, you have three issues:

  1. You display the newly allocated 'string' before you initialise it;
  2. You do not allocate enough memory to hold the string
  3. You do not terminate the string (and neither does strncpy because it did not encounter a string terminator within the allowed number of bytes).

I just spotted something else in your while (userInputToken != NULL) loop... You always to a string compare using userInputToken at the beginning of the loop, but inside the loop (and also in the part above the loop) you do this:

userInputToken = tmp;
free(tmp);

That means userInputToken is a dangling pointer. It points to memory that has been freed, and you must NOT use it. You will have to rethink your approach, and allow it to live until it's no longer needed.

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Thanks! 1: Should have been obvious to me. Thanks for pointing it out! 3: I am now manually assigning NULL to the end of my tmp. 4: I am now using strcpy(userInputToken, tmp) before free'ing tmp 2: I am trying to copy one fewer character than we originally had so I can strip undesired trailing characters. To this end, would something like this work?: tmp = malloc(sizeof(char)*strlen(userInputToken)); –  sikrob Jan 16 '13 at 12:43
    
Missed my 5 minute window for fixing previous comment - still getting used to posting here. At any rate, here what works in my code now: tmp = malloc(sizeof(char)*strlen(userInputToken)); strncpy(tmp, userInputToken, strlen(userInputToken)-1); tmp[strlen(userInputToken)-1] = NULL; I don't understand why it would be tmp[strlen(userInputToken)-1] that is assigned NULL as opposed to tmp[strlen(userInputToken)] though, and why did strlen show length 3 when it actually does account for the newline and must therefore have been 4 for the input of "yes\n"? –  sikrob Jan 16 '13 at 12:54
    
Wow, just realized I answered my own question in that comment. Thanks for bearing with me. –  sikrob Jan 16 '13 at 12:57
    
So do you need me to comment? =) Remember arrays are 0-based, so if you have 6 bytes, the last byte is index 5. That would allow a string of 5 characters in positions 0 to 4 plus a terminator in position 5. By the way, when we say "NULL character" we don't mean NULL, we mean the value 0 (or '\0' if you want to be fussy). Confusing terminology, I know, but NULL is intended for pointers and not for character values. –  paddy Jan 16 '13 at 14:54
    
Ah, actually, I'm really glad you commented! I didn't realize \0 and NULL actually did different things, I thought they were just ways of expressing the same thing. NULL does seem to be working in my code currently, but I'll switch out to \0. The thing that confused me on strlen is that it appeared to provide the length of the string without the newline, but when I used it as though it included the newline (which it should), everything works correctly. –  sikrob Jan 16 '13 at 20:02
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You should probably use calloc. You should also not use uninitialized memory like this. Malloc allocates memory in chunks. When you a free a chunk it may be reused. You don't get an exact size and until you mset the memory with malloc there is not guarantee as to what the value of its bytes will be. All you know is that you have a chunk of memory to use that is at least as big as the size you requested. So in this example, you are printing the old contents of the memory chunks before you write to it.

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Your validation of allocated length with this line is not correct:

printf("\npreC--tmp:%s\n", tmp); // This shows that the malloc DOES NOT use the given length.

malloc will allocated requested number of bytes, but it does not initialize the allocated memory. So when you try to print it as character string which should be terminating with '\0', it will try to print all characters until it finds '\0' in the memory. The terminating character may not be from the same memory block. Presence of '\0' is non-deterministic.

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I hope this helps

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <ctype.h>

#define MAX_INPUT 128
#define true 1
#define false 0

typedef struct _outputFlagContainer{

int  YES, QUIT;

}outputFlagContainer;


void run();
outputFlagContainer *getUserInput(outputFlagContainer *outputFlags);
outputFlagContainer *resetOutputFlags(outputFlagContainer *outputFlags);

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){

run();      
return 0;
}    

void run() {

    outputFlagContainer *outputFlags = malloc(sizeof(outputFlagContainer));

    while(true) {       

        puts("yes, quit, or other");

        outputFlags = getUserInput(outputFlags);

        if (outputFlags->YES) 
        {
            puts("It was a yes!");
        }
        else if (outputFlags->QUIT) 
        {
            break;
        }
        else
        {
            puts("bad input");
        }

    }

    free(outputFlags);
}

outputFlagContainer *resetOutputFlags(outputFlagContainer *outputFlags) {

    if(outputFlags!= NULL){

        outputFlags->YES = false;
        outputFlags->QUIT = false;      

    }

    return outputFlags;

}

outputFlagContainer *getUserInput(outputFlagContainer *outputFlags) {

    int len;
    char user_input[MAX_INPUT]={0};     // Zero Initialization

    char *userInput = NULL;
    char *userInputToken = NULL;
    char *tmp = NULL;
    char *finalCharacterCheck = NULL;

    // Tokens to search for:        // Immutable Strings
    char *QUIT = "QUIT";
    char *YES = "YES";

    // Reset The Structure
    outputFlags = resetOutputFlags(outputFlags);

    userInput = fgets(user_input, MAX_INPUT, stdin);        // it copies one less than MAX_INPUT 

    // Converting to Upper Case
    int i = 0;
    while(userInput[i]) {
        userInput[i] = toupper(userInput[i]);
        i++;
    }

    userInputToken = strtok(userInput, " ");

    if (userInputToken) {

        finalCharacterCheck = strchr(userInputToken, '\n');

        if (finalCharacterCheck) {

            len = strlen(userInputToken);

            printf("\n------uIT LENGTH:%d\n", len); // DEBUG LINE

            tmp = malloc(sizeof(char)*(len+1));
            if (tmp == NULL)
                exit(1);

            strncpy(tmp,userInputToken,len);
            tmp[len]='\0';

            printf("\npstC--tmp:%s\n", tmp); // Copies in the correct number of characters.

            strcpy(user_input,tmp);
            userInputToken = user_input;
            free(tmp);
            tmp = NULL;
        }
    }

    while (userInputToken != NULL) { // NULL = NO (more) tokens.

        if (0 == strcmp(userInputToken, YES)) {

            outputFlags->YES = true;

        } 
        else if (0 == strcmp(userInputToken, QUIT)) {

            outputFlags->QUIT = true;

        }

        userInputToken = strtok(NULL, " ");

        if (userInputToken) {

            finalCharacterCheck = strchr(userInputToken, '\n');

            if (finalCharacterCheck) {

                len = strlen(userInputToken);        
                tmp = malloc(sizeof(char)*(len+1));
                if (tmp == NULL) {
                    exit(1);
                }

                strncpy(tmp,userInputToken,len);
                tmp[len]='\0';

                strcpy(user_input,tmp);
                userInputToken = user_input;                                                
                free(tmp);
                tmp = NULL;
            }
        }
    }

    return outputFlags;
}
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