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I'm not sure why this doesn't work. Can someone clue me in? I don't see any events get logged, but they do get emitted...well, I think :)

{EventEmitter} = require 'events'

class Base extends EventEmitter

class App extends Base

  constructor: (cb) ->

    console.log 'setup'

    @on 'listener:1', (data) ->
      console.log 'listener 1: ' + data

    @on 'listener:2', (data) ->
      console.log 'listener 2: ' + data

    cb()

class One extends Base

  fire: () ->

    console.log 'fire 1'

    @emit 'listener:1', 1

class Two extends Base

  fire: () ->

    console.log 'fire 2'

    @emit 'listener:2', 2

new App(
  () ->
    setTimeout (->
      one = new One()
      one.fire()
      setTimeout (->
        two = new Two()
        two.fire()
      ), 2000
    ), 2000
)
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The output of the program is as expected; Only App sets up listeners on itself, but it never emits anything (only One and Two, which are not sublcasses of App, do so). Perhaps you're looking for something more like the following?

{EventEmitter} = require 'events'

class Base extends EventEmitter
  constructor: ->
    console.log 'setup'

    @on 'listener:1', (data) ->
      console.log 'listener 1: ' + data

    @on 'listener:2', (data) ->
      console.log 'listener 2: ' + data

class App extends Base
  constructor: (cb) ->
    super()
    cb()

class One extends Base
  fire: ->
    console.log 'fire 1'
    @emit 'listener:1', 1

class Two extends Base
  fire: ->
    console.log 'fire 2'
    @emit 'listener:2', 2

new App(
  ->
    setTimeout (->
      one = new One()
      one.fire()
      setTimeout (->
        two = new Two()
        two.fire()
      ), 2000
    ), 2000
)
share|improve this answer
    
Well, when you put it that way! I guess I assumed EventEmitter was global, like process or something. Maybe I need to rethink this. Thanks! – Frank LoVecchio Jan 16 '13 at 5:02
    
Ah, gotcha. Nope, listeners to events are local to the EventEmitter instance on is called on. You could build a "global" EventEmitter by creating an instance of one and exporting it as a module--kind like an Event Bus or something. – Michelle Tilley Jan 16 '13 at 5:07
    
That's exactly what I did :) Thanks! – Frank LoVecchio Jan 16 '13 at 17:08

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