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I have a method that has this signature

void SetFoo(QString& foo);

and I'm trying to pass an empty string inline, but none of the following compile

SetFoo("");
SetFoo(QString(""));

(error: no matching function for call to ‘MyClass::SetFoo(QString)’)

but if I create a variable like this, it works.

QString emptyFoo = "";
SetFoo(emptyFoo);

Is there not a way to call the method without creating a variable explicitly?

NOTE: Everything seem to work in windows environment with using vc++ compiler but I encounter the above mentioned compilation error in linux environment using g++.

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1  
It doesn't make sense to pass in a temporary. The fact that the reference is non-const means it probably modifies it, which a temporary ruins the point of. –  chris Jan 16 '13 at 4:55
3  
Everything seem to work in windows environment with using vc++ compiler vc++ has an evil extension allowing temporaries to bind to non-const references. –  Jesse Good Jan 16 '13 at 4:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can create a global object as a const QString nullStr() and use it everywhere- Somewhat similar to Null Object Pattern.

Alternatively as billz mentions, a const reference to a temporary can exist, so making it const Qstring& will enable the first 2 versions

Regardless, you should change the reference to const Qstring& if you dont intend to modify it.

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You should not define a non-const global null object. If it is modifiable, it may no longer be a null string for future usages. –  leemes Jan 16 '13 at 7:43
    
@leemes very true, fixed! –  Karthik T Jan 16 '13 at 7:45
    
Also, QString("") is not a null QString, it's an empty QString... ;) I fixed this. –  leemes Jan 16 '13 at 8:28

To bind a reference to a temporary object, you need const qualifier, if QString constructor takes char* input, try:

void SetFoo(const QString& foo);

It makes sense to pass a reference to outlived variable to SetFoo only:

void SetFoo(QString& foo);
QString s;
SetFoo(s);

. NOTE: Everything seem to work in windows environment with using vc++ compiler but I encounter the above mentioned compilation error in linux environment using g++.

VisualStudio is famous(good or bad way) for its C++ extentions, your code compiles on VS doesn't mean it's the C++ standards. The better way is to turn on compile warning(level 4) when you write code, it should give you a warning for binding a reference to temporary object.
Also lookup C++ standard, lookup compiler manuals to make sure your code is portable.

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