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I've decided to implement encryption for file transfers in my service. File transfers prior to this were not encrypted, and they were sent and received flawlessly with the exact same number of bytes.

Now I've introduced asymmetrical and symmetrical encryption into the mix to encrypt the data as it passes over the TCP protocol. I use asymmetrical to do an initial handshake passing the symmetrical key to the other party encrypted by the asymmetric public key. From then on out, the receiver of the file calls the sender periodically, and the sender generates a new initialization vector, encrypts the data with the symmetric key, and sends it over to be decrypted by the receiver using the IV and same symmetric key.

The chunk size I'm using is 2mb, such that the byte size of the generated chunks, with exception to the last chunk which varies, is 2097152. When AES encrypts this file with PaddingMode.PKCS7 and CipherMode.CBC, the resulting byte size is 2097168. It's gained about 16 bytes during the encryption process.

Now initially I thought this is where my problem was, but when I decrypt the data on the receiving end, it goes back to the 2097152 byte length and I write it to the file. I've proven to myself that it does indeed encrypt and decrypt the data.

On a small enough file, the file sizes from the original to the sender seem to be exactly the same. However, as I step up to larger file sizes, there exists a descrepency. On a video file(Wildlife.wmv from windows 7 install) of size 26,246,026 bytes, I am instead receiving a finished transfer that is of 26,246,218 bytes.

Why is there this size difference? What am I doing wrong here?

Here's some of my code.

For my encryption I am using the following class to encrypt or decrypt, returning a result in the form of a byte array.

public class AesCryptor
{
    public byte[] Encrypt(byte[] data, byte[] key, byte[] iv)
    {
        using (SymmetricAlgorithm aes = new AesManaged())
        {
            aes.Key = key;
            aes.IV = iv;
            aes.Padding = PaddingMode.PKCS7;
            aes.Mode = CipherMode.CBC;

            using (ICryptoTransform encryptor = aes.CreateEncryptor(key, iv))
            {
                return Crypt(data, key, iv, encryptor);
            }
        }
    }

    public byte[] Decrypt(byte[] data, byte[] key, byte[] iv)
    {
        using (SymmetricAlgorithm aes = new AesManaged())
        {
            aes.Key = key;
            aes.IV = iv;
            aes.Padding = PaddingMode.PKCS7;
            aes.Mode = CipherMode.CBC;

            using (ICryptoTransform decryptor = aes.CreateDecryptor(key, iv))
            {
                return Crypt(data, key, iv, decryptor);
            }
        }
    }

    private byte[] Crypt(byte[] data, byte[] key, byte[] iv, ICryptoTransform transform)
    {
        using (MemoryStream memoryStream = new MemoryStream())
        {
            using (CryptoStream cryptoStream = new CryptoStream(memoryStream, transform, CryptoStreamMode.Write))
            {
                cryptoStream.Write(data, 0, data.Length);
                cryptoStream.FlushFinalBlock();
            }
            return memoryStream.ToArray();
        }
    }
}

The sender of the file is encrypting the data(after the handshake of the private symmetric key) with this code(and a lot more that doesn't pertain to the actual encryption process. Note the chunkedFile.NextChunk(). This calls a method on the class that is doing the file chunking for me, returning 2mb chunk sizes unless the final size is smaller.

        byte[] buffer;
        byte[] iv = new byte[symmetricEncryptionBitSize / 8];
        using (var rngCrypto = new RNGCryptoServiceProvider())
            rngCrypto.GetBytes(iv);

        AesCryptor cryptor = new AesCryptor();

        buffer = cryptor.Encrypt(chunkedFile.NextChunk(), symmetricPrivateKey, iv);

The code below is what the receiver of the file uses(not all of it, this is what pertains to the decrypting of the data). The data is being written to a file stream(writer).

                    FileMessage message = hostChannel.ReceiveFile();
                    moreChunks = message.FileMetaData.MoreChunks;

                    UpdateTotalBytesTransferred(message);

                    writer.BaseStream.Position = filePosition;

                    byte[] decryptedStream;

                    // Copy the message stream out to a memory stream so we can work on it afterwards.
                    using (var memoryStream = new MemoryStream())
                    {
                        message.ChunkData.CopyTo(memoryStream);
                        decryptedStream = cryptor.Decrypt(memoryStream.ToArray(), symmetricPrivateKey, message.FileMetaData.InitializationVector);
                    }

                    writer.Write(decryptedStream);

By the way, in case it is needed, NextChunk is a very simple method.

        public byte[] NextChunk()
    {
        if (MoreChunks) // If there are more chunks, procede with the next chunking operation, otherwise throw an exception.
        {
            byte[] buffer;
            using (BinaryReader reader = new BinaryReader(File.OpenRead(FilePath)))
            {
                reader.BaseStream.Position = CurrentPosition;
                buffer = reader.ReadBytes((int)MaximumChunkSize);
            }
            CurrentPosition += buffer.LongLength; // Sets the stream position to be used for the next call.

            return buffer;
        }
        else
            throw new InvalidOperationException("The last chunk of the file has already been returned.");
    }

EDIT: It seems that for every chunk transferred, and thus every encryption, I am gaining 16bytes in file size. This does not happen with extremely small file sizes.

share|improve this question
    
This doesn't answer your cryptology woes, but you can configure WCF to do message and transport (https) encryption. – Matthew Jan 16 '13 at 5:06
    
Matthew - Yes, but unfortunately I am using a chunking method and streaming these chunks over, so I cannot use encryption or reliable messaging. I have to roll my own code to accomplish this and cannot rely on WCF. I found that streaming is leaps and bounds faster than a buffered message transfer, so this is why I am choosing this path. – Cowman Jan 16 '13 at 5:11
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well I solved the issue.

It turns out I was sending in the message data the chunkLength of the encrypted chunk data. So for every chunk I sent, even though I decrypted and wrote the correct filedata, I was advancing the stream position by the length of the encrypted data. This means every time I decrypted, when transferring more than 1 chunk(this is why the small files of only 1 chunk size didn't have problems) I was adding 16 bytes to the file size.

People helping me probably wouldn't have been able to figure this out, because I didn't include all of the data in the client side or the server side to see this. But thankfully I managed to answer it myself.

On the sender side, I was creating my FileMessage like this.

            FileMessage message = new FileMessage();
            message.FileMetaData = new FileMetaData(chunkedFile.MoreChunks, chunkedFile.ChunkLength, chunkedFile.CurrentPosition, iv);
            message.ChunkData = new MemoryStream(buffer);

If you see the second parameter of FileMetaData constructor, I'm passing in chunkedFile.ChunkLength which is supposed to be the length of the chunk. I was doing this on the encrypted chunk data, which resulted in sending the incorrect chunk length.

The client on the other hand, was receiving this extra information. If you look near the end, you'll see the code filePosition += message.FileMetaData.ChunkLength;. I was using that erroneous chunkLength to advance the file position. It turns out that setting of the streamPosition was not even necessary.

using (BinaryWriter writer = new BinaryWriter(File.OpenWrite(fileWritePath)))
            {
                writer.BaseStream.SetLength(0);

                while (moreChunks)
                {
                    FileMessage message = hostChannel.ReceiveFile();
                    moreChunks = message.FileMetaData.MoreChunks;

                    UpdateTotalBytesTransferred(message);

                    writer.BaseStream.Position = filePosition;

                    byte[] decryptedStream;

                    // Copy the message stream out to a memory stream so we can work on it afterwards.
                    using (var memoryStream = new MemoryStream())
                    {
                        message.ChunkData.CopyTo(memoryStream);
                        Debug.WriteLine("Received Encrypted buffer Length: " + memoryStream.Length);
                        decryptedStream = cryptor.Decrypt(memoryStream.ToArray(), symmetricPrivateKey, message.FileMetaData.InitializationVector);
                        Debug.WriteLine("Received Decrypted buffer Length: " + decryptedStream.Length);
                    }

                    writer.Write(decryptedStream);

                    TotalBytesTransferred = message.FileMetaData.FilePosition;

                    filePosition += message.FileMetaData.ChunkLength;
                }

                OnTransferComplete(this, EventArgs.Empty);
                StopSession();
            }

Such a simple bug, but one that wasn't leaping out at me quickly at all.

share|improve this answer

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