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I've write a function to reverse a c style string as follows

void reverse1(char* str) {
    char* str_end = strchr(str, 0);
    reverse(str, str_end);
}

and use this function to print the reversed string

void print(char* str) {
    for (int i=0; i!=sizeof(str); ++i) {
        cout << int(*(str+i)) << '\t';
    }
    cout << endl;
}

after reversing, the printing result is: 103 110 105 114 116 115 0 0 there will be one extra 0. I don't know that's why. Hope someone can help me. Thank you very much!

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2  
sizeof(str) is the size of the pointer. I'd recommend just using std::reverse. –  chris Jan 16 '13 at 6:05
1  
I am surprised it works so well, sizeof(str) should be just the size of a pointer, and not the length of the string as you would imagine. –  Karthik T Jan 16 '13 at 6:05
1  
Not sure but maybe it's \0 and not 0? –  Leri Jan 16 '13 at 6:07
    
@Nawaz fixed it –  Karthik T Jan 16 '13 at 6:07
1  
sizeof(str) should have been strlen(str), and a loop should work this way: for(int i = 0; i < strlen(str); i++){ } from what I see, your program shouldn't work at all. –  Aniket Jan 16 '13 at 6:09

2 Answers 2

The expression sizeof(str) results to 8 on a 64 bit platform. Therefore you get 8 numbers at standard output.

You should try to use std::string when you program in C++. If you insist to use C style string, you can write the output as:

void print(char* str) {
    for (int i=0; i<=strlen(str); ++i) {
        cout << int(*(str+i)) << '\t';
    }
    cout << endl;
}

or

void print(char* str) 
{
    do {
        cout << int(*str) << '\t';
    } while (*str++);
    cout << endl;
}
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What if str="" ? –  qPCR4vir Jan 16 '13 at 7:25
    
@qPCR4vir "" is a zero terminated string and you get one 0. –  harper Jan 16 '13 at 7:29
    
Your i != strlen version doesn't print the 0/NUL terminator, while the do { } while () version does. –  Tony D Jan 16 '13 at 7:33
    
But in the while you test one past these 0? –  qPCR4vir Jan 16 '13 at 7:34
    
increment str in the while will fix that? –  qPCR4vir Jan 16 '13 at 7:36

As @harper said

You should try to use std::string when you program in C++

If so, the easiest way (for me) to print reverse string and to see every character code is

std::copy( str.rbegin(), str.rend(), std::ostream_iterator< int >( std::cout, "\t" ) );

or

std::copy( str.rbegin(), str.rend(), std::ostream_iterator< char >( std::cout, "\t" ) );

to see every character itself

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