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I am fetching some log files (which are in txt format) from another server and trying to parse them using my perl script. The logs are being fetched correctly after which I set permissions to 777 for the log directory.

After this I attempt to open the log files, one by one for parsing, via my perl script. Now, the strange thing and the problem which happens is, my script is sometimes able to open the file and sometimes NOT. To put it simply, its unable to open the log files for parsing at times.

Also, I have cronned this perl script and the chances of file open failing are greater when it runs via cron rather than manually, although they have run successfully in both cases previously. I don't understand where the issue lies.

Here is the code which I use for opening the files,

$inputDir = "/path/to/dir";
@inputFiles = <$inputDir/*>;

# inputFiles array is list of files in the log directory
foreach my $logFile(@inputFiles)
{
    # just to ensure file name is text
    $logFile = $logFile."";

    # process file only if filename contains "NOK"
    if(index($logFile,"NOK") > -1)
    {
        # opens the file
        open($ifile, '<', $logFile) or die "Error: Unable to open file for processing.";

        # file parsing takes place
    }
}

close($ifile);

I want to re-iterate that this code HAS run successfully and I haven't changed any part of it. Yet, it does not run every time without fail, because its unable to open the log file at times. Any ideas?

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2  
In the open line's || die put $! In the string eg open(fh,<,file) || die "error opening file $!" This will add the os's error string into perls output and give a better idea of what's going on –  peteches Jan 16 '13 at 7:22
3  
You add an empty string to $logFile "just to ensure file name is text". What do you think it could be that is not text? –  Andy Lester Jan 16 '13 at 7:40
    
Thanks for the tip, I'll try it out, and as for the "", I concatenated "" at the end because the file name was not being read correctly without it. –  JTG Jan 16 '13 at 8:43
    
Rather than using index it would be clearer to use a regular expression: if ($logFile =~ /NOK/) { ... } –  Borodin Jan 16 '13 at 16:51
    
Have you completely omitted all ownership and file permission issues? –  Kenosis Jan 16 '13 at 17:50

3 Answers 3

up vote -1 down vote accepted

Maybe opening some files fails, because your program has too many open files. Your program opens all files in $inputDir and processes them in the loop. After that it closes the last file opened.

EDIT: after reading TLP's comment and reading perldoc -f close and perldoc -f open I see that TLP is right and the filehandle in $ifile is closed by a subsequent open($ifile,'<',$logFile) . However, if the file parsing code not shown by the topic creator creates another reference to $ifile the file handle would stay open.

Moving the call to close into the if block should solve your problem:

$inputDir = "/path/to/dir";
@inputFiles = <$inputDir/*>;

# inputFiles array is list of files in the log directory
foreach my $logFile(@inputFiles)
{

    # process file only if filename contains "NOK"
    if(index($logFile,"NOK") > -1)
    {
        # opens the file
        # added my to $ifile to keep local to this scope
        open(my $ifile, '<', $logFile) or die "Error: Unable to open file for processing.";

        # file parsing takes place

        # close current file
        close($ifile);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You are probably right, I have implemented this change also in my code. –  JTG Jan 16 '13 at 9:08
2  
No, performing a new open on an old file handle closes the old one first. Though it is not a bad idea to use a lexically scoped file handle, because it automatically closes when it goes out of scope (outside the if-block). –  TLP Jan 16 '13 at 9:22
    
@TLP My script has run as desired in 30+ test runs after implementing this change. Are you sure this really has no effect on script performance? –  JTG Jan 17 '13 at 5:20
    
@JTG Yes. Though the change itself is a good idea, I doubt very much that this is the cause of your problem. Perhaps you have some kind of lock on the files? –  TLP Jan 17 '13 at 6:04
    
@TLP I doubt if they have any lock... the log files are fetched from another server and full permissions are in place. Though, I would like to know if there is a good way to check that... "lsof" maybe? –  JTG Jan 17 '13 at 8:19

Just as an example, this is what you code should look like. You may like to try this version

use strict;
use warnings;

my $inputDir = '/path/to/dir';
my @inputFiles = <$inputDir/*>;

foreach my $logFile (grep /NOK/, @inputFiles) {
  open my $ifile, '<', $logFile or die qq(Unable to open "$logFile": $!);
  # Process data from <$ifile>;
}
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Thanks for this tip, I'll use this in my current and upcoming projects :) –  JTG Jan 17 '13 at 5:21

You should include the error message $! and the file name $logFile in your die string to see why the open failed, and for which file.

open($ifile, '<', $logFile) or die "Error: Unable to open $logFile: $!";

Also, this line:

$logFile = $logFile."";

...is quite redundant. If a conversion is necessary, perl will handle it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the tip, I'll add $! and look out for the exact failure code. Also, I concatenated "" at the end because the file name was not being read correctly without it (another mystery). –  JTG Jan 16 '13 at 8:36
    
@JTG What makes you think the file name was not being read correctly? Nothing in this code could have created a corrupted file name. –  TLP Jan 16 '13 at 8:43
    
To be specific, the condition which checks for "NOK" returned false for all cases, even when there was an "NOK" file. Guess it requires another post here. –  JTG Jan 16 '13 at 8:57
    
@JTG Create a minimal sample script which demonstrates your problem. I'm sure its something rather simple. Nothing in this code could cause it, except by changing the input. –  TLP Jan 16 '13 at 9:26
    
@JTG: Just to back up TLP: appending a null string to the file name cannot make any difference to this code. It is your imagination that it fixes something. –  Borodin Jan 16 '13 at 16:49

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