Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Below code:

 public class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            father f = new son(); Console.WriteLine(f.GetType());
            f.show();
         }
    }

    public class father
    {
      virtual public void show()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("father");
        }
    }

    public class son : father
    {
        public override void  show()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("son");
        }
    }

The result is 'son'.
If I modify the 'public override void show()' to 'public new void show()',the result is 'father'.

So I conclude below 'rules':

  • Use 'override', which function will be called is determined in run time. The program will choose the right function according to the real type of current object.(As above, the f's runtime type is son, so it calls the son's show.)
  • Use 'new' modifier, which function will be called is determined when it is compiled.The program will choose the object's declared type to call its function.(As above, the f's declared type is father ,so using 'new' modifier make the output to show 'father'.

All above are what I understand about polymorphism.Any misunderstanding and wrong?

share|improve this question
    
@Kal_Torak - i dont think so ...it can be asked over here on SO –  Pranay Rana Jan 16 '13 at 7:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use 'new' modifier, which function will be called is determined when it is compiled.The program will choose the object's declared type to call its function.(As above, the f's declared type is father ,so using 'new' modifier make the output to show 'father'.

Not really. The decision is still made at execution time, but the new method does not override the virtual method in the base class. This is most easily shown by extending your example somewhat:

using System;

class Base
{
    public virtual void Foo()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Base.Foo");
    }
}

class Derived : Base
{
    public override void Foo()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Derived.Foo");
    }
}

class MoreDerived : Derived
{
    public new void Foo()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("MoreDerived.Foo");
    }
}

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        Base x = new MoreDerived();
        x.Foo(); // Prints Derived.Foo
    }
}

Here, at compile time the decision is made to call the most overridden implementation of Base.Foo - if there were multiple Foo signatures, the decision about which signature to use would be taken, for example. Which implementation will be "the most overridden" is unknown at this point, of course.

At execution time, the CLR will find that most overridden implementation based on the actual type of the target object - which is MoreDerived. But MoreDerived.Foo doesn't override Base.Foo... whereas Derived.Foo does, so the implementation in Derived is the one which is actually executed.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for extended example.... –  Pranay Rana Jan 16 '13 at 7:50

yes it work like that only...your understanding is right..

But for second case when you use new intad of override it hide actual implementation i.e. parent class implementation

As the new keyword was used to define this method, the derived class method is not called—the base class method is called instead.

EXample from MSDN

// Define the base class
class Car
{
    public virtual void DescribeCar()
    {
        System.Console.WriteLine("Four wheels and an engine.");
    }
}

// Define the derived classes
class ConvertibleCar : Car
{
    public new virtual void DescribeCar()
    {
        base.DescribeCar();
        System.Console.WriteLine("A roof that opens up.");
    }
}

class Minivan : Car
{
    public override void DescribeCar()
    {
        base.DescribeCar();
        System.Console.WriteLine("Carries seven people.");
    }
}

call to the class

Car[] cars = new Car[3];
cars[0] = new Car();
cars[1] = new ConvertibleCar();
cars[2] = new Minivan();

output

Car object: YourApplication.Car
Four wheels and an engine.
----------
Car object: YourApplication.ConvertibleCar
Four wheels and an engine.
----------
Car object: YourApplication.Minivan
Four wheels and an engine.
Carries seven people.
----------

MSDN having good example of it : Knowing When to Use Override and New Keywords (C# Programming Guide)

share|improve this answer
    
how to understand 'hide'. hide what? hide to whom? –  roast_soul Jan 16 '13 at 7:54
    
@roast_soul - check the example that describe the thing better way ...you can also check JonSkeet example in one of the answer which explain the new keyword working in C# –  Pranay Rana Jan 16 '13 at 7:56
    
@roast_soul - hide in term when you call method it doent find appropriate method and call the method realted to boject..which is celarly shwon in exaple given above ..when you call method with base class it call the method of base class insted of child class which is hiding implementation of base with new key word –  Pranay Rana Jan 16 '13 at 7:58

Use 'new' modifier, which function will be called is determined when it is compiled.The program will choose the object's declared type to call its function.(As above, the f's declared type is father ,so using 'new' modifier make the output to show 'father'.

This is slightly wrong. Using new means that this function does not override any functions of the base class. The function dispatch still happens at runtime, but this function is not considered. The difference would be clearer if you had Grandson or Daughter classes to test more.

share|improve this answer

A normal method is called by type of class and a virtual method is called by content of memory allocated to the object. Now keyword new hides the concept of polymorphic and just care for its type.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.