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I have successfully encrypted data in BlackBerry in AES format. In order to verify my result, I am trying to implement decryption in BlackBerry using the following method:

 private static byte[] decrypt( byte[] keyData, byte[] ciphertext )throws CryptoException, IOException
{
   // First, create the AESKey again.
   AESKey key = new AESKey( keyData );

   // Now, create the decryptor engine.
   AESDecryptorEngine engine = new AESDecryptorEngine( key );
   // Since we cannot guarantee that the data will be of an equal block length
   // we want to use a padding engine (PKCS5 in this case).
   PKCS5UnformatterEngine uengine = new PKCS5UnformatterEngine( engine );

   // Create the BlockDecryptor to hide the decryption details away.
   ByteArrayInputStream input = new ByteArrayInputStream( ciphertext );
   BlockDecryptor decryptor = new BlockDecryptor( uengine, input );

   // Now, read in the data. Remember that the last 20 bytes represent
   // the SHA1 hash of the decrypted data.
   byte[] temp = new byte[ 100 ];
   DataBuffer buffer = new DataBuffer();

   for( ;; ) {
       int bytesRead = decryptor.read( temp );
       buffer.write( temp, 0, bytesRead );

       if( bytesRead < 100 ) {
           // We ran out of data.
           break;
       }
   }

   byte[] plaintextAndHash = buffer.getArray();
   int plaintextLength = plaintextAndHash.length - SHA1Digest.DIGEST_LENGTH;
   byte[] plaintext = new byte[ plaintextLength ];
   byte[] hash = new byte[ SHA1Digest.DIGEST_LENGTH ];

   System.arraycopy( plaintextAndHash, 0, plaintext, 0, plaintextLength );
   System.arraycopy( plaintextAndHash, plaintextLength, hash, 0,
       SHA1Digest.DIGEST_LENGTH );

   // Now, hash the plaintext and compare against the hash
   // that we found in the decrypted data.
   SHA1Digest digest = new SHA1Digest();
   digest.update( plaintext );
   byte[] hash2 = digest.getDigest();

   if( !Arrays.equals( hash, hash2 )) {
       throw new RuntimeException();
   }

   return plaintext;
}

I get an exception thrown "BadPaddingException" at the following line

int bytesRead = decryptor.read( temp );

Can anybody please help.

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Can you elaborate a bit on this? How should I implement this? Is this whats causing this exception? Is this what you are suggesting: byte[] raw = IOUtilities.streamToBytes(input) and then use this array to get the hex value? –  Sarah Jan 16 '13 at 9:11
    
No, it is not. Forget it. I'm about to post a more elaborated answer. –  Mister Smith Jan 16 '13 at 9:18
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think the problem might be in this block:

    for( ;; ) {
       int bytesRead = decryptor.read( temp );
       buffer.write( temp, 0, bytesRead );

       if( bytesRead < 100 ) {
           // We ran out of data.
           break;
       }
   }

When read returns -1, you are also writing it to the buffer. And the exit condition is also wrong. Compare that to the block in CryptoDemo sample project:

    for( ;; ) {
        int bytesRead = decryptor.read( temp );

        if( bytesRead <= 0 )
        {
            // We have run out of information to read, bail out of loop
            break;
        }

        db.write(temp, 0, bytesRead);
     }

Also there are a few points you should be careful about, even if they are not causing the error:

    AESDecryptorEngine engine = new AESDecryptorEngine( key );

If you read the docs for this constructor, it says:

"Creates an instance of the AESEncryptorEngine class given the AES key with a default block length of 16 bytes."

But in the previous line, when you create the key, you are doing this:

    AESKey key = new AESKey( keyData );

Which according to the docs, it "Creates the longest key possible from existing data.", BUT only "the first 128 bits of the array are used". So it does not matter what length your keyData has, you will always be using a 128 bit key length, which is the shortest of the 3 available sizes (128, 192, 256).

Instead, you could explicitly select the algorithm block key length. For instance, to use AES-256:

AESKey key = new AESKey(keyData, 0, 256); //key length in BITS
AESDecryptorEngine engine = new AESDecryptorEngine(key, 32); //key lenth IN BYTES

Finally, even if you get this working, you should be aware that directly deriving the key from the password (which might be of an arbitrary size) is not secure. You could use PKCS5KDF2PseudoRandomSource to derive an stronger key from the key material (password), instead of just using PKCS5 for padding.

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About my final comment, have a look at this answer. You might want to use PBKDF2 with salt instead of PKCS5. –  Mister Smith Jan 16 '13 at 9:40
    
Edited answer to include link on how to derive a key from a password in BlackBerry. –  Mister Smith Jan 16 '13 at 9:45
    
Thanks for the detailed info; indeed helpful. However, I am still getting an error in the for loop but now the exception thrown is CryptoIOException. Secondly passing AESDecryptorEngine(key, 256) also throws an IllegalArgumentException. I fixed this but how to work around the CryptoIOException and why is this thrown? –  Sarah Jan 16 '13 at 10:57
    
The IllegalArgumentException is thrown because there's a bug in the code I posted. Key lengths should be passed in bytes for the AESDecryptorEngine constructor, unlike AESKey constructor that needs the length in bits, so replace 256 for 32 only in the engine. I'll also edit my answer. About the crypto exception, could you post here as a comment the exception message? –  Mister Smith Jan 16 '13 at 11:24
    
From your code: "Remember that the last 20 bytes represent the SHA1 hash of the decrypted data". You probably copied the sample for loop as is. You need to pass only the first N-100 bytes to the engine, and the last 100 bytes to the checksum block, being N the length of ciphertext argument. –  Mister Smith Jan 16 '13 at 11:53
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Your encrypted data should be correctly padded to the block size (16 bytes). Try to decrypt the data without padding, and see if tail bytes correspond to PKCS#5 padding (for instance, if it was needed 5 bytes of padding, it should be appended with 0x05 0x05 0x05 0x05 0x05 bytes).

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I tried removing the padding but it doesnt change. The problem is the method exits before I can check for the bytes. –  Sarah Jan 16 '13 at 9:12
    
@Sarah you will have to feed the BlockDecryptor the engine instead of the uengine to do this, Sarah. But it is likely that this will run and produce random looking binary output. If it does look like something then the other side is not padding correctly. –  owlstead Jan 17 '13 at 0:28
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The problem is that any data with the correct block size will decrypt. The issue with that is that it will likely decrypt to random looking garbage. Random looking garbage is not often compatible with the PKCS#7 padding scheme, hence the exception.

I say problem because this exception may be thrown if the key data is invalid, if the wrong padding or block mode was used or simply if the input data was garbled during the process. The best way to debug this is to make 100% sure that the algorithms match, and that the binary input parameters (including default ones by the API) match precisely on both sides.

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I have debugged and my key data as well as the data to decrypt (encrypted value) both are absolutely correct. I am seriously lost with this. Can you help me write a better decryption method? This was my first attempt.. –  Sarah Jan 17 '13 at 5:25
    
Sorry, that would be seriously out of scope for StackOverflow. Furthermore, I'm not an expert in the BlackBerry / ME frameworks, so I would have to look up quite a lot. –  owlstead Jan 18 '13 at 14:35
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