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I know the difference between static function and normal function in C, my question is: Is there any difference between the variables declared in a static function and the variables declared in a normal function in C?

Thanks.

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Are you talking about normal variables in static and normal function or static and normal variables in static and normal function? I am bit confused here. –  Abhineet Jan 16 '13 at 7:52
    
I mean the normal variables in static and normal function. –  Jude Jan 16 '13 at 8:12

5 Answers 5

Is there any difference between the variables declared in a static function and the variables declared in a normal function in C?

Answer: NO there is no difference

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Variables declared in functions have nothing to do with their storage class type. All variables defined in a function (static or not), will have their scope defined until the function exits. Whereas, a function being static or not will only define it's visibility to other files.

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No, the static keyword only applies to visibility when applied to a function.

The static keyword for functions tells the compiler/linker that the function should not be visible outside the file. When applied to a function, static in C is equivalent to private in languages like Java or C++.

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The static keyword for functions tells the compiler/linker that the function should not be visible outside the class No, this is not correct. static functions in C++ are not related to access specification. Access specifiers do that. static in C governs the linkage. It gives the function an internal linkage(default linkage is external). Internal linkage limits the scope and hence visibility of the function/variable in the same Translation unit. –  Alok Save Jan 16 '13 at 8:48
    
Since when did C have classes? Your second statement claims so. And what you state is incorrect. Just comparing one trait and claiming the two separate language constructs to be same is simply incorrect. –  Alok Save Jan 16 '13 at 8:53

Both variables are automatic, hence they are allocated on the stack.

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The best answer to this question. –  Abhineet Jan 16 '13 at 12:47

The term static used in a static function makes that function scope only to that particular .c file. This will not do anything to the variables (auto, static or register) declared inside that static function.

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