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I am trying to access the properties of the MainObj inside the onclick of an elem. Is there a better way to design it so the reference wont be to "MainObj.config.url" but to something like this.config.url

Sample code:

var MainObj = {
      config: { url: 'http://www.mysite.com/'},
      func: function()
      {
          elem.onclick = function() {
           var url_pre = MainObj.config.url+this.getAttribute('href');

           window.open(url_pre, '_new');
          };
      }

}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

'this' inside the object always refers to itself (the object). just save the context into a variable and use it. the variable is often called '_this', 'self' or '_self' (here i use _self):

var MainObj = {
  config: { url: 'http://www.mysite.com/'},
  func: function()
  {
      var _self = this;
       elem.onclick = function() {
       var url_pre = _self.config.url+this.getAttribute('href');

       window.open(url_pre, '_new');
      };
  }
}
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Just make sure you don’t do something like MainObj.func.call('foo') –  David Jan 16 '13 at 8:36
    
@David: or worse still: var someFunc = MainObj.func; someFunc(); :), this will probably do for the OP, but it's not the safest way to go –  Elias Van Ootegem Jan 16 '13 at 8:38
    
I am not sure this is the best answer but since it requires little change for my code i used it and selecting it. –  user235410 Jan 16 '13 at 9:56
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You can use the Module pattern:

var MainObj = (function () {
      var config = { url: 'http://www.mysite.com/'};
      return {
         func: function() {
             elem.onclick = function() {
                 var url_pre = config.url+this.getAttribute('href');
                 window.open(url_pre, '_new');
             };
          }
      };
}());

First we define the config object in the local function scope. After that we return an object literal in the return statement. This object contains the func function which later can be invoked like: MainObj.func.

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you are right with your answer, but i dont see how your answer is an answer to THIS question –  hereandnow78 Jan 16 '13 at 8:31
    
Now we don't have MainObj.config.url, forgot to fix it. Thanks for your comment. –  Minko Gechev Jan 16 '13 at 8:32
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There is, most certainly, a better way... but I must say: binding an event handler in a method is -and I'm sorry for this- a terrible idea.
You might want to check MDN, about what it has to say about the this keyword, because this has confused and tripped up many a man. In your snippet, for example, this is used correctly: it'll reference elem. Having said that, this is what you could do:

var MainObj = (function()
{
    var that = {config: { url: 'http://www.google.com/'}};//create closure var, which can be referenced whenever you need it
    that.func = function()
    {
        elem.onclick = function(e)
        {
            e = e || window.event;
            window.open(that.config.url + this.getAttribute('href'));
        };
    };
    return that;//expose
}());

But as I said, binding an event handler inside a method is just not the way to go:

MainObj.func();
MainObj.func();//shouldn't be possible, but it is

Why not, simply do this:

var MainObj = (function()
{
    var that = {config: { url: 'http://www.google.com/'}};
    that.handler = function(e)
    {
        e = e || window.event;
        window.open(that.config.url + this.getAttribute('href'));
    };
    that.init = function(elem)
    {//pass elem as argument
        elem.onclick = that.handler;
        delete that.init;//don't init twice
        delete that.handler;//doesn't delete the function, but the reference too it
    };
    return that;//expose
}());
MainObj.init(document.body);

Even so, this is not the way I'd write this code at all, but then I do tend to over-complicate things every now and then. But do look into how the call context is determined in JS, and how closures, object references and GC works, too... it's worth the effort.

Update:
As requested by the OP - an alternative approach

(function()
{
    'use strict';
    var config = {url: 'http://www.google.com/'},
    handlers = {load: function(e)
        {
           document.getElementById('container').addEventListener('click',handlers.click,false);
        },
        click: function(e)
        {
            e = e || window.event;
            var target = e.target || e.srcElement;
            //which element has been clicked?
            if (target.tagName.toLowerCase() === 'a')
            {
                window.open(config.url + target.getAttribute('href'));
                if (e.preventDefault)
                {
                    e.preventDefault();
                    e.stopPropagation();
                }
                e.returnValue = false;
                e.cancelBubble = true;
                return false;//overkill
            }
            switch(target.id)
            {
                case 'foo':
                    //handle click for #foo element
                return;
                case 'bar': //handle bar
                return;
                default:
                   if (target.className.indexOf('clickClass') === -1)
                   {
                       return;
                   }
            }
            //treat elements with class clickClass here
        }
    };
    document.addEventListener('load',handlers.load,false);//<-- ~= init
}());

This is just as an example, and it's far from finished. Things like the preventDefault calls, I tend to avoid (for X-browser compatibility and ease of use, I augment the Event.prototype).
I'm not going to post a ton of links to my own questions, but have a look at my profile, and check the JavaScript questions. There are a couple of examples that might be of interest to you (including one on how to augment the Event.prototype in a X-browser context)

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Thanks, how will you write the event handler method binding? –  user235410 Jan 16 '13 at 8:38
    
@user235410: Well, I use IIFE's all over, in combination with the module pattern... and I usually delegate all events. It would look like overkill in this case, but it just makes for more manageable code in the long run... In my experience, it can boost performance, too. I'll add the code, but I don't know what your needs are, so it could very well be that it simply doesn't meet your needs at all –  Elias Van Ootegem Jan 16 '13 at 8:42
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