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I need java pattern for string not bounded by a character.

I have a string (as mentioned below), with some curly brackets bounded by single quotes and other curly brackets that are not. I want to replace the curly brackets that are not bounded by single quotes, with another string.

Original string:

this is single-quoted curly '{'something'}' and this is {not} end

Needs to be converted to

this is single-quoted curly '{'something'}' and this is <<not>> end

Notice that the curly brackets { } that are not bounded by single quotes have been replaced with << >>.

However, my code prints (character gets eaten up) the text as

this is single-quoted curly '{'something'}' and this is<<no>> end

when I use the pattern

[^']([{}])

My code is

String regex = "[^']([{}])";
Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile(regex);
Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(str);

while (matcher.find()) {
    if ( "{".equals(matcher.group(1)) ) {
        matcher.appendReplacement(strBuffer, "&lt;&lt;");
    } else if ( "}".equals(matcher.group(1))) {
        matcher.appendReplacement(strBuffer, "&gt;&gt;");
    }
}
matcher.appendTail(strBuffer);
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is a clear use case for zero-width assertions. The regex you need isn't very complex:

String 
   input = "this is single-quoted curly '{'something'}' and this is {not} end",
  output = "this is single-quoted curly '{'something'}' and this is <<not>> end";
System.out.println(input.replaceAll("(?<!')\\{(.*?)\\}(?!')", "<<$1>>")
                        .equals(output));

prints

true
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+1, Thank you for pointing out the flaw in my (now deleted) answer. –  jlordo Jan 16 '13 at 9:16
    
Thanks so much, that was helpful –  Jyahoo Test Jan 17 '13 at 1:29
    
Sorry everybody, unable to Vote Up on answers (says... not enough reputations). Have answered Yes to the "Was this post useful to you?" question. –  Jyahoo Test Jan 17 '13 at 1:40

Use the negative lookahead / lookbehind constructs from the special constructs section of the Java Pattern documentation.

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2  
One "simpler" way is to use capturing group and backreference in replacement string. –  nhahtdh Jan 16 '13 at 8:42
    
@nhahtdh yes, but I wouldn't call that simpler, I'd call it messier. I like to put all pattern matching into the pattern if it's possible, and not into the processing logic. –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jan 16 '13 at 9:07
    
It's "simpler" (in quote), since it may not apply to everyone. Of course, personally, I'd use look-around. –  nhahtdh Jan 16 '13 at 10:18

Try this :

String regex = "([^'])([{}])";
    Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile(regex);
    Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(str);

    while (matcher.find()) {
        if ("{".equals(matcher.group(2))) {
            matcher.appendReplacement(strBuffer, matcher.group(1) + "<<");
        } else if ("}".equals(matcher.group(2))) {
            matcher.appendReplacement(strBuffer,matcher.group(1) + ">>");
        }
    }
    matcher.appendTail(strBuffer);
share|improve this answer
    
Just a correction of your own code. :) –  Rajat Garg Jan 16 '13 at 8:52
    
Thank you for the correction. I tried a few regex-s unsuccessfully but this is great. :) –  Jyahoo Test Jan 17 '13 at 1:32
    
You should have accepted my answer if it worked for you. :/ –  Rajat Garg Jan 17 '13 at 5:37

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