Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this block of code:

 while IFS=$'\n' read -r line || [[ -n "$line" ]]; do
    if [ "$line" != "" ]; then
        echo -e "$lanIP\t$line" >> /tmp/ipList;
    fi
done < "/tmp/includeList"

I know this must be really simple. But I have another list (/tmp/excludeList). I only want to echo the line within my while loop if the line ins't found in my excludeList. How do I do that. Is there some awk statement or something?

share|improve this question
    
check this:theunixshell.blogspot.com/2012/12/… –  Vijay Jan 16 '13 at 13:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

use grep

while IFS=$'\n' read -r line || [[ -n "$line" ]]; do
    if [[ -n ${line} ]] \
        && ! grep -xF "$line" excludefile &>/dev/null; then
       echo -e "$lanIP\t$line" >> /tmp/ipList;
    fi
done < "/tmp/includeList"

the -n $line means if $line is not empty the grep returns true if $line is found in exclude file which is inverted by the ! so returns true if the line is not found.
-x means line matched so nothing else can appear on the line
-F means fixed string so if any metacharacters end up in $line they'll be matched literally.

Hope this helps

share|improve this answer
    
I think this is really close. It doesn't seem to work because my includeList doesn't have a line break at the end of the last line and my excludeList does. So, essentially, I need it to not worry about whether or not there is a line break at the end of the lines. –  exvance Jan 16 '13 at 9:44
    
try ditching the -x on the grep. –  peteches Jan 16 '13 at 10:07
1  
Try running the time command on the above vs the awk or grep-only solutions posted and I expect you'll find this is at least one order of magnitude slower. It's the wrong approach. –  Ed Morton Jan 16 '13 at 13:59
    
In this case my lists are very small and this solution performs well enough. –  exvance Jan 16 '13 at 17:18
    
Probably all of the answers would work. Some might be faster than others. This answer worked for me and I selected it because it required the least amount of change to my existing code. –  exvance Jan 16 '13 at 17:20

You can do this with grep alone:

$ cat file
blue
green
red
yellow
pink

$ cat exclude 
green
pink

$ grep -vx -f exclude file
blue
red
yellow

The -v flag tells grep to only output the lines in file that are not found in exclude and the -x flags forces whole line matching.

share|improve this answer
    
problem with that though is that if any line in exclude does not match line grep will return true, so not really useful to decide if a line is not in the file. –  peteches Jan 16 '13 at 10:18
    
Why does the exit status matter, you only want to process lines in file that are not in exclude so just grep -vx -f exclude file | process..? –  iiSeymour Jan 16 '13 at 10:21
    
Ah yeah if you filter with grep prior to the redirection to the while loop. I was thinking about greping the exclude file from inside the loop. –  peteches Jan 16 '13 at 10:25
1  
@peteches I don't think looping is required here at all, majority of occasion if you are greping inside a loop you probably could be doing it simpler. –  iiSeymour Jan 16 '13 at 10:31

With awk:

awk -v ip=$lanIP -v OFS="\t" '
    NR==FNR {exclude[$0]=1; next}
    /[^[:space:]]/ && !($0 in exclude) {print ip, $0}
' /tmp/excludeList /tmp/includeList > /tmpipList

This reads the exclude list info an array (as the array keys) -- the NR==FNR condition is true while awk is reading the first file from the arguments. Then, while reading the include file, if the current line contains a non-space character and it does not exist in the exclude array, print it.

The equivalent with grep:

grep -vxF -f /tmp/excludeList /tmp/includeList | while IFS= read -r line; do
    [[ -n "$line" ]] && printf "%s\t%s\n" "$ipList" "$line"
done > /tmp/ipList
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.