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I have a static method whose internal code is capable of working with multiple different classes. However I am unsure how to get the classes into the method at run time.

For example lets say I have ClassA and ClassB

My method can work with either of these classes and so I want the parameters to look something like.

public static void MyMethod(Object obj)
{
    //...obj is either ClassA or ClassB
    //...do work on variable class
}

But I keep getting an invalid argument message when I try either

ClassA a = new ClassA();
MyMethod(a);

ClassB b = new ClassB();
MyMethod(b)

Is it even possible to have a parameter who's Type is unknown until runtime?

If so how do I do this?

If not, how can a method that performs some function on many classes by utilised in this way, without repeating the method code in every class?

EDIT - I have edited the above as my code DOES indeed pass in an instance of a class, and not just the class name. However I still do get the Invalid argument message.

share|improve this question
    
do you mean instances of ClassA or Type instance? You can't pass class name as itself like this MyMethod(ClassA) – Ilya Ivanov Jan 16 '13 at 9:34
    
BTW, you might want to consider having the two types implement a common interface, and make it MyMethod(ISomeInterface obj) – Marc Gravell Jan 16 '13 at 9:42

Assuming ClassA is a type name, then that syntax is not valid; you must either pass in an instance of the type, or the Type of the type:

MyMethod(new ClassA());

or

MyMethod(typeof(ClassA));

For the latter case, you could also consider refactoring to use generics:

MyMethod<ClassA>();

Is it even possible to have a parameter who's Type is unknown until runtime?

Absolutely; object would be fine, but you need to give that parameter a valid value.

share|improve this answer
    
Isn't it a huge LSP violation with static void MyMethod(Object obj) and then casting obj to ClassA or ClassB? – Ilya Ivanov Jan 16 '13 at 9:37
    
@IlyaIvanov nobody said anything about casting to those, specifically. An interface might be the ideal solution, but it really depends on the full context, which we don't really know. – Marc Gravell Jan 16 '13 at 9:40
    
ok, I don't give objections to your answer. I've just wondered regarding assumption obj is either ClassA or ClassB in question and how method overloading fits to this need. – Ilya Ivanov Jan 16 '13 at 9:44

You need to pass an instance (object) of the class. Try:

MyMethod(new ClassA());
MyMethod(new ClassB());

I would suggest overloading MyMethod, such as:

public void MyMethod(ClassA a) { ... }
punlic void MyMethod(ClassB b) { ... }
share|improve this answer
    
How is having multiple overloads (one per parameter type) any better than repeating the method in each class? Both seem to include a lot of repeated code. – PJW Jan 16 '13 at 9:51

You are passing a type, not an instance of a type.

Consider this instead:-

var test = new ClassA();
MyMethod(test);
share|improve this answer

You should overload MyMethod as suggested by Richard.

If you still want to use just one method definition, you could use something like:

public static void UnknownArgumentsMethod2(params object[] list)
{
    foreach (object o in list)
    {
        if (o.GetType() == typeof(int))
        {
            Console.WriteLine("This is an integer: " + (int)o);
        }
        else if (o.GetType() == typeof(ClassA))
        {
            Console.WriteLine("This is an object of ClassA");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

If ClassA and ClassB have same function signatures, consider using Interfaces. If implementations are same as well, implement them in base abstract class and override them in inherited classes if required.

interface IMyInterface
{
    void MethodX();
}

abstract class ClassBase: IMyInterface
{
    public virtual void MethodX()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("MethodX from base class");
    }
}

// this will use base class implementation of MethodX
class ClassA : ClassBase
{
}

class ClassB : Classbase
{
    public void MethodX()
    {
         Console.WriteLine("MethodX from ClassB");
    }
}


class Foo
{
    public void MyMethod(IMyInterface obj)
    {
        obj.MethodX();
    }
}



Foo f = new Foo();

IMyInterface ca = new ClassA();
f.MyMethod(ca);  // This Print MethodX from ClassA, in this case BaseClass

IMyInterface cb = new ClassB();
f.MyMethod(cb);  // This Print MethodX from ClassB
share|improve this answer
    
I don't see how an Interface helps here. As an Interface includes no implementations, I'd have to repeat he code in every class that uses the Interface. Repetition of code is what I am trying to avoid. – PJW Jan 16 '13 at 9:50

Actually the error was here -

public static void MyMethod(Object obj)

Once I changed the parameter as follows:

public static void MyMethod(object obj)

it worked fine :)

share|improve this answer
    
I just came across this answer. Object and object are the same thing: System.Object. Those two lines are exactly the same! – Andrew Dec 18 '14 at 14:55

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