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I a having a sorted file with numeric values like

foo 2.3
bar 2.6
baz 4.7

and would like to have a one-liner which puts the percentile of a line into the last column, like

foo 2.3 0.3333
bar 2.6 0.6666
baz 4.7 1.0000

Thank you.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I assume you mean percent of lines, for this you need to know the number of lines first.

Here's one way to do it as a two-pass solution with awk:

 awk 'FNR == NR { tot=NR; next } { printf( "%s %.4f\n", $0, FNR/tot) }' file file 

Output:

foo 2.3 0.3333
bar 2.6 0.6667
baz 4.7 1.0000

The first block is only active during FNR == NR i.e. the first pass. The second block takes care of the printing.

Other alternatives to determine length of file

Use NR-1 when starting second pass (FNR != NR):

awk 'FNR != NR { if(!tot) tot=NR-1; printf( "%s %.4f\n", $0, FNR/tot) }' file file

Use wc before running awk:

awk -v tot=$(wc -l < file) '{ printf( "%s %.4f\n", $0, FNR/tot) }' file
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Thank you. It generally does the job, but percent of lines is outputted to the first column without a delimiting space. –  Mario Konschake Jan 16 '13 at 10:08
    
@MarioKonschake: it works with gawk and nawk, which version of awk are you using? –  Thor Jan 16 '13 at 10:15
1  
Run the command dos2unix on your file. looks like it contains ^M characters –  Guru Jan 16 '13 at 10:22
2  
@sarathi Then this is the correct approach since you wouldn't be able to store that much data in an array. –  Ed Morton Jan 16 '13 at 17:24
1  
+1 for the approach but you can replace FNR == NR { tot=NR; next } or similar with just tot=NR-FNR in any script where you just want to process the file on the second pass with a count of the number of lines in the file. –  Ed Morton Jan 16 '13 at 17:34
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$ awk 'c=NR-FNR{printf "%s %.4f\n",$0,FNR/c}' file file
foo 2.3 0.3333
bar 2.6 0.6667
baz 4.7 1.0000
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even though @thor solution is good, there is no need to traverse the file twice.Instead we can do it inside the memory itself.

awk '{a[NR]=$0;}END{for(i=1;i<=NR;i++)print a[i],i/NR;}' your_file

tested:

> cat temp
foo 2.3
bar 2.6
baz 4.7
> awk '{a[NR]=$0;}END{for(i=1;i<=NR;i++)print a[i],i/NR;}' temp
foo 2.3 0.333333
bar 2.6 0.666667
baz 4.7 1

if you are specific about the precision then use below:

> awk '{a[NR]=$0;}END{for(i=1;i<=NR;i++)printf("%s %0.4f\n",a[i],i/NR);}' temp
foo 2.3 0.3333
bar 2.6 0.6667
baz 4.7 1.0000
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