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<?php
    class Stat
    {
        public $var1='H';
        public static $staticVar = 'Static var';


        static function check()
        {

            echo $this->var1;               
            echo "<br />".self::$staticVar ."<br />";
            self::$staticVar = 'Changed Static';
            echo self::$staticVar."<br />";
        }
        function check2()
        {
            Stat::check();
            echo $this->var1;           
            echo "b";
        }
    }

?>

Can i use it like this

$a = new Stat();
$a->check2();
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closed as not a real question by Mark Baker, Romain Francois, Adam Arold, Björn Kaiser, Anand Jan 16 '13 at 13:35

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
How would a static method know what instance of an object it should be accessing to access non-static properties? The simple answer is "No". The more detailed answer is that it should issue a error "use of $this in a static context" –  Mark Baker Jan 16 '13 at 10:12
    
If it can, then PHP is even more b0rked than I thought. Only an instance method should be able to access instance variables. –  Alnitak Jan 16 '13 at 10:13
1  
I believe this will throw an error. As you cannot access a non static property from a static method. In c# you could make the property static and access the static property from the static method, but as i recall i dont believe you can do that in php? but im happy to be corrected on that. –  Nicholas King Jan 16 '13 at 10:15
    
@NicholasKing you can create static properties in PHP, it would basically transform the static class into a singleton, but, yeah, it's possible. Why does OP need a non-static property from within a static method is beyond me though, a static property would do just fine. –  Mahn Jan 16 '13 at 10:23
    
Some of the people above need to get off there high horses. @Jan yes a user can try and see that $this isnt accessible inside a static method however maybe the user above thought that someone with more experience might know a way to do it. instead of giving the user grief maybe just explain that it isnt possible. –  SubstanceD May 16 '13 at 16:15

4 Answers 4

No. A static method will not have access to $this (as there is no $this to talk about in a static context).

If you need a reference to the current object within the static method, it is not a static method. You can however access static properties and functions from a non-static method.

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You just can't. The explanation is simple: there is no access to $this in a static method context. You have to find another design to achieve what you want :-)

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As the other answers say, you can't use the instance methods in a static method. However, you can store a static property being an array of your instances. With some code like this:

private static $_instances = array();

public function __construct() {
    self::$_instances[] = $this;
}

This way, you can call a method on all the instances in a static method. With some code like this:

public static effItAll() {
    foreach (self::$_instances as $instance) {
        $instance->instanceMethod();
    }
}

Or you could also just store the last instance. Or some instance depending on the parameters. Whatever, you can just store any instance in a static property, thus being able to then call this instance in your static method.

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No. Static methods and instance objects can not work together in this way. However, you can pass a reference of your instance object to the static method:

static function check(&$classReference) //Adding class reference to function
{

    echo $classReference->var1;               
    echo "<br />".self::$staticVar ."<br />";
    self::$staticVar = 'Changed Static';
    echo self::$staticVar."<br />";
}
function check2()
{
    Stat::check($this); //Passing $this
    echo $this->var1;           
    echo "b";
}

However, just because it's possible doesn't mean it should be done. There's probably another way to achieve what you want in a much better OOP way.

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