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I am using Ruby1.9.3. I am newbie to this platform.

From the docs I got to know we can make Regexp using the below :

  • %r{pattern}
  • /pattern/

Now is there any difference between the the two styles above mentioned, interms of fast pattern matching symbol, Area specifics(***can use/can't use restrictions***) etc.

I found one as below :

irb(main):006:0> s= '2/3'
=> "2/3"
irb(main):008:0> /2\/3/ =~ s
=> 0
irb(main):009:0> %r(2/3) =~ s
=> 0
irb(main):010:0> exit

Here I found one diferrence between %r(..) and /../ is we don't need to use \ to escape /. Is there any more from your practical experiences?

EDIT

As per @akashspeaking suggestion I tried this and found what he said:

> re=%r(2/3)­
=> /2\/3/   # giving the pattern /../. Means Ruby internally converted this %r(..) to /../, which it should not if we created such regexp pattern manually.
> 

From the above it is very clear theoretically that %r(..) is slower than the /../.

Can anyone help me by executing quickbm(10000000) { /2\­/3/=~s } and quickbm(10000000) { %r(2/3) =~ s }to measure the execution time. I don't have the required gem benchmark installed here. But curios to know the output of that two.If any one has - could you try on your terminal and paste the details here?

Thanks

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closed as too localized by sawa, the Tin Man, Andy H, Alexis Pigeon, JaredMcAteer Jan 17 '13 at 14:56

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The same as /../. The delimiter itself may need to be escaped. –  halfelf Jan 16 '13 at 10:24
    
This is a nonsensical question. There is no difference in run-time performance of %r/foo/ and /foo/, though you are looking for something. And, Ruby includes Benchmark as part of its standard library, so it is ALWAYS available. –  the Tin Man Jan 17 '13 at 4:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is absolutely no difference in %r/foo/ and /foo/.

irb(main):001:0> %r[foo]
=> /foo/
irb(main):002:0> %r{foo}
=> /foo/
irb(main):003:0> /foo/
=> /foo/

The source script will be analyzed by the interpreter at startup and both will be converted to a regexp, which, at run-time, will be the same.

The only difference is the source-code, not the executable. Try this:

require 'benchmark'

str = (('a'..'z').to_a * 256).join + 'foo'
n = 1_000_000

puts RUBY_VERSION, n
puts

Benchmark.bm do |b|
  b.report('%r') { n.times { str[%r/foo/] } }
  b.report('/') { n.times { str[/foo/] } }
end

Which outputs:

1.9.3
1000000

      user     system      total        real
%r  8.000000   0.000000   8.000000 (  8.014767)
/  8.000000   0.000000   8.000000 (  8.010062)

That's on an old MacBook Pro running 10.8.2. Think about it, that's 6,656,000,000 (26 * 256 * 1,000,000) characters being searched and both returned what's essentially the same value. Coincidence? I think not.

Running this on a machine and getting an answer that varies significantly between the two tests on that CPU would indicate a difference in run-time performance of the two syntactically different ways of specifying the same thing. I seriously doubt that will happen.


EDIT:

Running it multiple times shows the randomness in action. I adjusted the code a bit to make it do five loops across the benchmarks this morning. The system was scanning the disk while running the tests so they took a little longer, but they still show minor random differences between the two runs:

require 'benchmark'

str = (('a'..'z').to_a * 256).join + 'foo'
n = 1_000_000

puts RUBY_VERSION, n
puts

regex = 'foo'
Benchmark.bm(2) do |b|
  5.times do
    b.report('%r') { n.times { str[%r/#{ regex }/] } }
    b.report('/')  { n.times { str[/#{ regex }/] } }
  end
end

And the results:

      # user     system      total        real
%r  12.440000   0.030000  12.470000 ( 12.475312)
/   12.420000   0.030000  12.450000 ( 12.455737)
%r  12.400000   0.020000  12.420000 ( 12.431750)
/   12.400000   0.020000  12.420000 ( 12.417107)
%r  12.430000   0.030000  12.460000 ( 12.467275)
/   12.390000   0.020000  12.410000 ( 12.418452)
%r  12.400000   0.030000  12.430000 ( 12.432781)
/   12.390000   0.020000  12.410000 ( 12.412609)
%r  12.410000   0.020000  12.430000 ( 12.427783)
/   12.420000   0.020000  12.440000 ( 12.449336)

Running about two seconds later:

      # user     system      total        real
%r  12.360000   0.020000  12.380000 ( 12.390146)
/   12.370000   0.030000  12.400000 ( 12.391151)
%r  12.370000   0.020000  12.390000 ( 12.397819)
/   12.380000   0.020000  12.400000 ( 12.399413)
%r  12.410000   0.020000  12.430000 ( 12.440236)
/   12.420000   0.030000  12.450000 ( 12.438158)
%r  12.560000   0.040000  12.600000 ( 12.969364)
/   12.640000   0.050000  12.690000 ( 12.810051)
%r  13.160000   0.120000  13.280000 ( 14.624694) # <-- opened new browser window
/   12.650000   0.040000  12.690000 ( 13.040637)

There is no consistent difference in speed.

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+1 to you! humm, the difference is slight,I can see. But still there is a difference - 'mathematics` proved that,as per the statistics from your post. This is the difference for such a small Regexp.The amount really would matter for average size regular expression - I think! Anyway thanks to show me the report! –  arun_roy Jan 17 '13 at 12:27
    
The difference is nothing. You're seeing random events from various system processes firing causing minor slowdowns. In other words, you're looking for something that isn't there. –  the Tin Man Jan 17 '13 at 13:58

Here I found one diferrence between %r(..) and /../ is we don't need to use \ to escape /.

That is their primary use. Unlike strings, whose delimiters change their semantics, the only real differences between the regular expression literals are the delimiters themselves.

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Look also to this thread The Ruby %r{ } expression and 2 paragraphs of this doc http://www.ruby-doc.org/core-1.9.3/Regexp.html

there is no difference except of using any symbols as delimiters after %r instead of //

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If you use %r notation, you can use an arbitrary symbol as delimiter. For example, you can write a regex as any of the following (and more):

%r{pattern}
%r[pattern]
%r(pattern)
%r!pattern!

This can be useful if your regex contains lots of '/'

Note: No matter what you use, it will be saved in default form. i.e. %r:pattern: will default to /pattern/

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+1 to you to highlight the default factor,which no one mentioned! in that context default form. i.e. %r:pattern: will default to /pattern/ we can then say %r[..] would be bit slower than the /../ ? Correct me if i am wrong? –  arun_roy Jan 16 '13 at 13:09
    
Sure. We are definitely looking at extra overhead of defaulting. So theoretically it will be slower. But it might not be significant in small scenarios. –  Akash Agrawal Jan 16 '13 at 13:21
    
Yeah! I am looking for a way to get it proved by a program with some code and statistics! If I can,hope that will be great :) –  arun_roy Jan 16 '13 at 13:27
1  
I just ran both 100000 times each and found the difference to be negligible. –  Akash Agrawal Jan 16 '13 at 14:19
    
Okay can you try it with some big expressions - there might be a good factor,we can get! –  arun_roy Jan 16 '13 at 14:23

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